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Matt Welch, tabloid.net


THE PUTNAM PIT
[No bull]

Here is the list of lawyers barred from practicing law by the Tennessee Supreme Court, as reported by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility

For updated list of all lawyers disciplined by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility, click here

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Dog X -- The Watchdog of the Upper Cumberland
 
A. DISBARMENTS


Robert B. Akard, Jr., of Knoxville and Nashville, was disbarred on March 5, 1996. A Default Judgment was entered.

Mr. Akard falsely signed the name of another attorney to a bond, stole funds belonging to his law firm and stole $485,000 from a business associate. The hearing panel found violations of DR 1-102(A)(3)(4)(5) and (6) and DR 9-102(A) and (B).

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William L. Arendall, of Franklin, acted as guardian and later as the administrator of the Eula Bishop Johnson Estate and as guardian of the Mary Alice Baxter Estate. He disbursed funds in excess of the amount permitted by law. While acting in a number of fiduciary capacities regarding the Estates of A. J. Vaughn, J. V. Owens, and G. C. Morrow and wife, he paid to himself large and clearly excessive sums for which he failed to account as required by law. His disbarment on September 16, 1985, was based upon his "Consent to Disbarment" submitted to the Board of Professional Responsibility, which had filed a Petition for Discipline against him.

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Larry M. Baker, a Memphis lawyer, was disbarred by order of disbarment on consent entered on June 30, 1989. Baker had been temporarily suspended by the Supreme Court on March 29, 1989, based upon affidavits which demonstrated that he had misappropriated funds entrusted to him to his own use.

The hearing panel granted a default judgment and found the charges against Baker were deemed admitted and further found that, because of the charges being deemed admitted, the only appropriate sanction to be imposed was disbarment.

Baker was the closing attorney in several real estate transactions. He engaged in numerous instances of misappropriating funds entrusted to him. His misappropriations amounted to approximately $250,000.

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Phillip D. Barber, of Dickson County, consented to disbarment on August 24, 1978, after having been charged with unlawfully using, and authorizing a corporate client to unlawfully use the toll-free telephone number of a large national corporation.

On November 14, 1983, Barber was reinstated to practice law.

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Martin Bean, of Chattanooga, was disbarred by consent by order entered September 4, 1987. Bean was convicted of willfully conspiring and confederating with others to distribute and possess marijuana.

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Charles Edgar Beaty, a former Nashville attorney, was disbarred by Order entered on February 10, 1993. Beaty submitted an affidavit consenting to disbarment because of having committed various automobile breaking or entering offenses in the State of North Carolina.

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Jones Chamberlain Beene, IV, of Knox County, was disbarred on August 27, 1981, after having been convicted of possession of controlled substances with intent to sell and deliver and sentenced to six to ten years in the penitentiary.
 
 

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Douglas R. Berry, of Goodlettsville, was disbarred by order entered January 12, 1990. He was found guilty of twenty-seven counts of crimes in the United States District Court. Berry was temporarily suspended on March 3, 1989. A hearing committee held Berry should be disbarred on September 13, 1989.

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Tyler R. Berry III, a Franklin attorney, was disbarred by Order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee on June 10, 1991. The disbarment resulted from formal charges filed against him by the Board of Professional Responsibility, a hearing conducted before a Hearing Committee of the Board, and his subsequent appeal of the Hearing Committee's Judgment of Disbarment.

The Hearing Committee, and later the trial judge designated by the Supreme Court to hear the appeal, found Berry had violated the Tennessee Code Annotated as well as the Disciplinary Rules of the Code of Professional Responsibility when acting as the Executor of the Estate of Sallie S. Cox. Berry neglected the administration of the Estate, paid to himself unreasonable, unauthorized and excessive fees, failed to maintain satisfactory records regarding the administration of the Estate and failed to account and report both to the Court and beneficiaries of the Estate.

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Harold Ray Blakney, who formerly practiced law in Memphis, has been disbarred for the second time by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Formal charges of ethical misconduct were filed against Blakney and a judgment by default was entered by a Hearing Committee on August 12, 1991. No appeal was filed. The Court, on November 25, 1991, entered an order disbarring Blakney, noting that he had previously been disbarred by the Court. His first disbarment was in September 1991, and this after he had been in a suspended status as a lawyer since August 1990.

Blakney was suspended for embezzling funds from an estate. Formal charges and proceedings by the Board resulted in his disbarment. An investigation disclosed that his embezzlement of funds entrusted to him from estates and guardianships was a course of conduct - numerous estates and guardianships had been looted and the entrusted funds were used for his own use and benefit. Additional charges were instituted by the Board against him which resulted in his second disbarment. This unusual sanction, a double disbarment, was advanced by the Board based upon the repeated misappropriation of funds entrusted to him.
 
 

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James Arnold Brown, Jr., a Dickson attorney, was disbarred from the practice of law by Order of the Supreme Court entered November 19, 1990. Brown consented to disbarment because he could not successfully defend himself on charges filed against him. Brown conceded that he had violated DR 1-102(A) by engaging in illegal conduct involving moral turpitude and engaging in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation. He also conceded that he violated DR 7-l0l(A)(4) by intentionally prejudicing or damaging, his client during the course of a professional relationship. He also conceded that he violated DR 9-102(A) and (B) by failing to properly maintain his attorney trust account.

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William Dunlap Cannon III, a Memphis attorney, was disbarred by Order entered on August 1, 1994. Cannon consented to disbarment by submitting a confidential affidavit conceding he had violated various disciplinary rules.

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Laurence A. Canter, of Scottsdale, Arizona; Cupertino and San Rafael, California; but licensed to practice law in Tennessee, was disbarred on June 5, 1997 and required to concurrently serve a one year suspension for violating DR 2-101 and DR 1-102. Canter placed an ad on more than 5,000 Internet news groups and 10,000 e-mail lists, all unsolicited, which required the reader to read at least a portion of the message. A hearing panel found this to be in violation of the advertising rules and an intrusion into the receiver's privacy rights. Additionally, the panel found Canter communicated inadequately with his client on an immigration matter, charged an improper retainer, failed to return the client his file, and demanded improperly for the client to provide a full release. Further, Canter neglected another client's matters, failed to communicate adequately with that client, and misappropriated $350 held in trust for the client. Finally, Canter withheld funds from an employee's paycheck, misappropriated funds for his own use, did not pay the funds to the appropriate authorities, and made paychecks to his employee with insufficient funds to cover. To be reinstated, Canter will have to follow court precedent and retake the bar exam.

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Johnny Wayne Carden, of Lawrenceburg, was disbarred by Supreme Court order issued September 19, 1985. Carden consented to the disbarment after having been charged with misappropriating $17,000 from the F.D.I.C. and $55,000 from a client. He also was alleged to have negligently allowed the statute of limitations to run against another client in a Workers' Compensation action.

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Michael T. Cark, of Chattanooga, was disbarred on December 3, 1997. The hearing panel found that Cark practiced a pattern of fraud, deceit and deception upon clients, that ten out of twenty complaints involved misappropriation of client funds and/or property was not returned or reimbursed, that he abandoned and neglected his clients without proper notice or without taking steps to protect his clients, and that he intentionally made false and deceptive representations to clients, opposing counsel, and judges. The panel conditioned reinstatement upon full restitution to all clients, including the return of all funds and/or property which was improperly retained.

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Marvin M. Cash, of Chattanooga, was disbarred by consent by order entered July 20, 1987. Cash admitted to felonious possession of more than ten pounds of marijuana. He voluntarily surrendered his license after a complaint, based on his guilty plea in Criminal Court, was filed against him with the Board.

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Samuel J. Chappell, a Nashville attorney, consented to disbarment and was disbarred on November 24, 1992. Chappell submitted a confidential affidavit indicating he had violated DR 1-102(A)(3)(4)(6). Chappell had also submitted guilty pleas to two counts of an indictment for bank fraud in the U.S. District Court in Nashville.

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Lewis Franklin Clark, of Gibson County, was disbarred on June 19, 1981, after having been convicted of conspiracy in distribution of controlled substances in violation of 21 U.S.C. 846 and sentenced to five years.

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Richard R. Clark, of Nashville, was disbarred, effective November 20, 1996. Clark filed an affidavit in which he acknowledged that he could not successfully defend himself on the disciplinary charges filed against him. Clark misappropriated funds belonging to Mattre B. Woods while serving as conservator for her in the Probate Court of Davidson County, Tennessee. Clark's action violated DR 1-102(A)(4)(5) and (6). The Supreme Court ordered that respondent make restitution in the amount of $82,851.69 as a condition precedent to reinstatement.
 
 

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William Collier, a Memphis lawyer, now living in Nashville, voluntarily surrendered his license on October 31, 1989, pending the outcome of criminal charges filed against him in federal court. Collins was indicted by the U. S. government for embezzlement of money, goods and services owned and under control of the Memphis Area Legal Services, Inc., of which he was the former Executive Director.
 
 

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William T. Conner, of Crossville, was disbarred by consent by order entered July 6, 1987. He admitted that he had (1) misappropriated over $90,000 from some thirteen (13) different clients; (2) neglected several clients' cases, allowing statutes of limitations to run and default judgments to be taken; (3) misrepresented to clients the status of their cases; (4) took fees for work not done; and (5) defamed another attorney by wrongly accusing him of misappropriating money, an accusation which Conner knew was false and which resulted in a civil judgment against him.

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Herman Andrew Crisler III, of Memphis, was disbarred on April 24, 1997. A hearing panel found that Crisler violated DR 1-102 (A) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) ; DR 2-106(A) (B); DR 2-110(A) (1) (2) (3) (b) (4); DR 3-101(B) ; DR 4-101(B) (1) (2) (3) (4); DR 5-101(A); DR 6-101(A) (2) (3); DR 7-101(A) (1) (2) (3) (4) ; DR 9-102(A) (B) (4) and T.C.A. 23-3-201(3)(5). The hearing panel judgment further found as aggravating circumstances: Crisler's prior disciplinary history; Crisler's failure to notify his clients of his temporary suspension; his apparently indifferent, if not uncooperative, attitude in giving notification and returning files to clients; Crisler's failure to address restitution; and Crisler's failure to communicate with clients, effectively abandoning his clients to their detriment; and Crisler's failure to respond to complaints. The judgment further found that Crisler should make full restitution to all complainants with judgments or valid claims and that Crisler should make restitution to the Lawyer's Fund for Client Protection.

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Francis E. Dichtel, of Memphis, was disbarred on April 7, 1998 and required to make restitution to persons named in the original and supplemental petitions or to the Tennessee Lawyers Fund for Client Protection for any funds which the fund may have disbursed as a result of Dichtel's actions. Dichtel had already been suspended for one year and one month on September 11, 1996 for accepting fees from clients and failing to take any action on their behalf, for neglecting client cases, for failing to communicate with clients, failing to avoid conflicts of interest, failing to preserve client property, lack of candor, and for making false statements and misrepresentations to clients and to the Board of Professional Responsibility in forty-two complaints filed with the Board. The hearing panel found that the Board carried the burden of proof as to aggravating factors, thus warranting the increase in the degree of discipline imposed against Dichtel.

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Russell C. Dafferner, of Memphis, was disbarred on September 20, 1995. On May 1, 1995, the judgment of the hearing panel was that Dafferner should be disbarred and ordered to make restitution to six former clients. Dafferner did not appeal the hearing panel's decision and therefore on September 20, 1995, the Tennessee Supreme Court entered an Order of Enforcement disbarring Dafferner and requiring him to make restitution to six former clients.
 
 

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James P. Diamond, formerly a Jackson, Tennessee lawyer, was suspended from the practice of law in 1986, and was disbarred by the Supreme Court of Tennessee on January 27, 1992.

Diamond was charged with misappropriating funds belonging to his client. Formal disciplinary proceedings were instituted after Diamond had been sued in the Madison County Chancery Court and a substantial judgment was rendered against him in August 1989. A Hearing Committee rendered a judgment of disbarment, and no appeal was taken.

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William T. Diamond, Jr., of Jackson, was disbarred by an order filed October 22, 1997. The hearing panel and the Supreme Court found that Diamond had paid himself approximately $57,000 in fees from an estate without first seeking court approval, thereby violating DR 7-102 and DR 9-102; that he failed to perform his duties as an executor in a timely and proper manner, violating DR 1-102, DR 6-101 and DR 7-101; that he failed to appear and obey the order of the General Sessions Court of Madison County; and that he was found in contempt by that court, violating DR 7-102, DR 7-102, and DR 7-106; and that he presented an escrow check to the clerk for court ordered reimbursement to the estate when insufficient funds were in his account to cover the reimbursement check, violating DR l- 102, DR 7-102, and DR 9-102. The panel found no mitigating circumstances but considered Diamond's previous discipline and substantial experience in the practice of law to be aggravating circumstances.

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Mary Pentecost Evans, of Knoxville, consented to disbarment following her plea of guilty to criminal charges of aiding and abetting her client, an inmate, in escaping from the custody of penal authorities. The disbarment order was entered March 26, 1984.

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Robert H. Feeney, formerly of Lincoln County, accepted a $1,000 retainer fee and left town and has not been located; he removed his automobile which was subject to a security interest from the state without the knowledge or consent of the lienholder; and he failed to pay child support. Formal charges were mailed to his last known address and he failed to respond to the charges. A hearing panel recommended disbarment which was entered by the Supreme Court on May 10, 1983.

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William E. Fortas, Shelby County, was originally charged with numerous instances of delinquencies in forwarding loan payments, insurance premiums, property taxes and other such proceeds from real estate closings resulting in threatened foreclosure proceedings, cancellation of insurance policies, untimely payment of property taxes or other such consequences or penalties.

He was also charged with improper use of his former law firm's escrow account. Before a hearing could be scheduled on the above charges, supplemental charges were filed against him for mishandling proceeds from real estate closings in two other instances wherein respondents failed to promptly pay or deliver proceeds from the closing other complaints of similar misconduct were made prior to a hearing. A mortgage company complained that Respondent, after considerable delay, forwarded closing proceeds by four checks on his Trust Account, each in excess of $10,000.00 and each being dishonored because of insufficient funds. Disciplinary Counsel sought and obtained an order for Respondent to show cause why he should not be temporarily suspended for causing public ham and misappropriating funds to his own use and enjoined from further withdrawals on his account pursuant to Rule 9 (4.3). Prior to the show cause hearing Respondent consented to disbarment on November 30, 1978.

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Albert J. Fox, of Madison, was disbarred by an order dated August 12, 1997. A hearing panel found Fox to be in violation of DR 1-102; DR 2-106; DR 5-101; DR 5-104; DR 7-101; and DR 9-102 for conflicts of interests with those of his client; for soliciting and obtaining, with a dishonest or selfish motive, $50,000 from his client for investment in Fox's personal business adventure, without advising the client to seek independent legal advice; and for preparing a Durable General Power of Attorney in which Fox was appointed the attorney-in-fact without advising the client to seek independent legal advice. Additionally, Fox was found to have prepared a living will in which all of his client's substantial assets were to be transferred, where Fox was named co-trustee and was to receive a testamentary disposition of 25% of the assets for his discretionary use, without advising his client to obtain independent legal advice, and to have charged the client an excessive fee; and for his continued practice of law after transferring his license to retired status. The hearing committee found the following aggravating facts: prior disciplinary offenses, dishonest or selfish motives, refusal to acknowledge the wrongful nature of the conduct, vulnerability of the victim, substantial experience in the practice of law, and indifference in making restitution.

Fox will not be allowed to be reinstated until he makes restitution to the client by paying $50,000, until he successfully passes the ethics portion of the bar exam, and until he takes a full ethics course at a school licensed by the state of Tennessee or by the American Bar Association. Further, Fox must obtain and keep malpractice insurance for at least $500,000.
 
 

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Mark D. Francis, a Memphis attorney, was disbarred by Order entered on September 29, 1993. A hearing panel found that Francis failed to communicate with his clients and the Board; neglected, abandoned, and was dishonest about his clients' legal matters; misappropriated funds; failed to abide with his contract with Lawyers Helping Lawyers; was held in contempt of court in the Court of Criminal Appeals that resulted in his being jailed; directly solicited legal business from persons in the hospital; and various other violations relating to misrepresentations made to clients.
 
 

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Maurice E. Franklin, a Memphis attorney, was disbarred by order entered February 29, 1988. The Hearing Committee consolidated two petitions for discipline, one alleged eight separate instances of ethical misconduct and the other alleged four additional complaints.

Franklin's failure to answer or appear before the Hearing Committee was considered an aggravating circumstance. As a result of his nonappearance, the Hearing Committee was unable to find any mitigating circumstances.

The Hearing Committee found, inter alia, that Franklin was not using funds received and deposited in his real estate escrow account for the purpose for which they were entrusted. Franklin forged an endorsement on a check in the amount of $35,575.41 which was to have been used to pay off a mortgage indebtedness. Franklin failed to deliver other funds entrusted to him which caused injury to his client. He also failed to act on behalf of clients after he accepted their cases and payment of fees. He also refused to return property to clients or communicate with them.

The Hearing Committee found that Franklin's conduct was so serious and caused such injury to those who entrusted their legal matters to him that he was totally unfit to retain his license to practice law.

Franklin was also disbarred on February 29, 1988, as a result of a 1985 petition in which the Chancery Court for Shelby County had found that he was guilty of gross negligence and incompetence, guilty of intentional misconduct, and guilty of a course of conduct involving fraud, incompetence, dishonest dealing and failing to meet the standards required of attorneys in Tennessee.

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Donald Ray (Jake) Gamble, of Crossville, Cumberland County, was disbarred on July 11, 1997 after pleading guilty to a violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1957 in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee. Gamble reported this matter to the Board and consented to disbarment.

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Edgar Hardin Gillock, a Memphis attorney and former State Senator, was disbarred by order entered July 12, 1988. Gillock filed a conditional guilty plea which was accepted by the Hearing Panel and approved by the Court that the disbarment would be nunc pro tunc to the date he was originally suspended from the practice of law, December 7, 1982.

Gillock had been suspended from the practice of law in December 1982, but no formal proceeding before the Hearing Panel was held until all appeals from his conviction were concluded. He had been charged with using his official position and influence in obtaining contracts for Honeywell Information Systems for which he was paid approximately $150,000. The U. S. District Court in Memphis convicted Gillock of conspiracy (mail fraud and wire fraud); mail fraud; wire fraud; aiding and abetting wire and mail fraud; interference with commerce by extortion; and income tax evasion. Upon conviction he was sentenced to a total of seven years imprisonment and fined $10,000. The fine was forgiven and the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned his conviction for conspiracy, but refused to reverse the other convictions.

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Wayne B. Glasgow, Jr., of Franklin, entered an agreed order, conceding that he had violated DR 1-102(A)(3) and (4). The disbarment of Mr. Glasgow is retroactive to October 14, 1992, the date upon which he was temporarily suspended.

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Mark W. Goad, of Murfreesboro, was disbarred January 21, 1997. A hearing panel entered a Default Judgment of Disbarment against him.

Goad had been temporarily suspended form the practice of law since December 9, 1994, based on a finding that he had misappropriated funds of a client and that he posed a substantial threat of irreparable harm to the public. Goad sought unsuccessfully to have that suspension dissolved.

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Edward F. Gordon, a Brentwood attorney, was disbarred by the Supreme Court on April 24, 1991. He was suspended from the practice of law on March 9, 1990, by Agreed Order. A Petition for Discipline was filed against Gordon on May 30, 1990, and Judgment by Default was entered by a Hearing Committee on February 12, 1991. The Judgment found that Gordon had misappropriated funds totaling approximately $900,000 from a Tennessee partnership while acting as attorney and managing partner; he misappropriated approximately $230,000 from another partnership and forged the signature of a partner to obtain the funds; and he misrepresented applying money totaling approximately $322,000 to retire an indebtedness when he actually misappropriated the sum. In a third case the Judgment found Gordon had misappropriated trust funds of approximately $250,000 from an individual client.

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Billy Gray, of Shelby County, was indicted for fraud and conspiracy to extort $150,000.00 from a criminal defendant in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1343 and 1372. He was found guilty by a jury and received widespread publicity. Respondent was immediately suspended from the practice of law upon his conviction.

On September 19, 1978, Respondent was disbarred from practice.

On May 5, 1986, Gray's Petition for Reinstatement was denied.

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Gary W. Groover, of Anderson County, appropriated $14,000 of a client's trust fund to his own personal use. The monies had been deposited with him in connection with a contract involving the client's home which was under construction. In another matter, he settled a client's personal injury claim and received the proceeds. His escrow check to the clients for their proceeds was dishonored for insufficient funds.

The Anderson County Grand Jury indicted him on August 3, 1979, for fraudulent breach of trust and passing a forged instrument.

On May 23, 1980, the hearing panel recommended disbarment which was entered by the Supreme Court on June 18, 1980.

On April 26, 1985, Groover was reinstated to practice law.

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Steven C. Grosland, an attorney licensed to practice law in Tennessee, was disbarred by Order entered on July 15, 1993. The disbarment in Tennessee was reciprocal discipline to his disbarment in Illinois for conversion of client funds.

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Michael E. Harrington, of Memphis, was disbarred on March 27, 1997 by a default judgment. The allegations pending against Harrington involved misappropriation of client funds, abandonment of practice, continuing to practice law after suspension of his license for nonpayment of fees and failing to comply with CLE, charging an excessive fee and taking money to provide a legal service when he was suspended from the practice of law.

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Ronald E. Hedges, a Knoxville attorney, was disbarred by order entered July 20, 1988. Hedges filed a conditional guilty plea which was accepted and approved by the Court that his disbarment would be retroactive to the date of the indefinite interim suspension of his law license on October 15, 1986.

Hedges had been convicted in the U. S. District Court of Florida of a conspiracy to defraud the United States in a matter related to the importation and distribution of illegal drugs (i.e., laundering money).

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William Anthony Helm, of Henderson, was disbarred by order entered August 29, 1986, upon the recommendation of a Hearing Panel. Helm was found to be addicted to drugs, and in May of 1985, he had pled guilty to possession of a controlled substance. His addiction adversely affected his ability to practice law, and Helm was aware of this problem. In addition, in January 1986, a Chancery Court found that Helm had disappeared and abandoned his law practice. The Court appointed another lawyer to inventory Helm's files and protect the interest of his clients. Aggravating circumstances were that Helm: (1) represented that he would quit the practice of law until his addiction was overcome, but failed to do so; (2) misrepresented himself to clients and to the Hearing Panel; (3) failed to attend the hearing on a disciplinary matter; and (4) failed to cooperate and communicate with the attorney who represented him at the hearing. Conditions for reinstatement imposed by the Hearing Panel included: (1) successful completion of an ethics course at an accredited law school; (2) successful completion of the Tennessee Bar examination; (3) abstinence from drugs; (4) participation in a drug rehabilitation program directed by a competent medical authority; and (5) submission of periodic reports of progress and such other proof as deemed appropriate.

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J.D. Hickman, of Kingsport, was disbarred on November 12, 1996. Mr. Hickman filed an affidavit consenting to disbarment because he could not successfully defend himself against charges that he had violated DR 1-102(A)(3)(4) by engaging in illegal conduct involving moral turpitude and conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation, and DR 9-102, and admitting to the material facts arising out of the charges of violation of the disciplinary rules. The charges arose out of Hickman's representation of the estate of an individual and his appointment as power of attorney of another.

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Joseph Miranda Hoats, of Davidson County, entered a guilty plea to an indictment charging him with possessing 32 grams of marijuana in the trunk of his automobile for resale. He consented to a disbarment which was entered on April 4, 1983.

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Richard F. Hoffman, of Knoxville, was disbarred by the Supreme Court on June 4, 1997.

Hoffman had taken a loan from an individual in the amount of $18,000 and executed a promissory note for the debt which was secured by the deed of trust to his and his wife's house. Hoffman quit making payments on the note. When an attorney tried to help collect the note, it was determined that Hoffman had asked a notary public to notarize his wife's signature on the deed of trust outside of her presence, which the notary did. A hearing panel granted a default judgment on the matter, finding Hoffman in violation of DR 1-102. The panel recommended Hoffman to be disbarred, and the Supreme Court accepted. Prior to reinstatement, Hoffman must make full restitution of $18,000 plus interest and attorney fees to the holder of the promissory note and must offer proof and a report from a counselor that he is no longer a threat to the general public. Additionally, if reinstated, Hoffman must be under the supervision of another attorney for at least three years.

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David L. Hogland, of Memphis was disbarred by the Supreme Court at the recommendation of the hearing panel on November 7, 1997 for violating DR 1-102; DR 2-106; DR 2-110; DR 6-101; DR 7101; and DR 9-102. The hearing panel found Hogland guilty of five counts of defrauding First Tennessee Bank and the National Bank of Commerce with no mitigating circumstances. Additionally, the panel found Hogland guilty of severe neglect of his client's cases and dishonesty and fraud. Hogland was required to make full restoration to all complainants with valid claims and to the Lawyers' Fund for Client Protection for any money, if any, paid out of the fund.

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William Bracken Ingram, of Nashville, was disbarred upon recommendation of the hearing panel for having prepared a forged and fraudulent divorce decree and delivering it to his client when, in fact, he had failed to file the divorce suit on behalf of his client. In another matter he misappropriated approximately $15,500 of estate funds entrusted to him for his own use, making restitution when the misappropriation was discovered.

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James L. Jones, of Knoxville, was disbarred by order entered on July 17, 1990. The court approved the hearing committee's findings and judgment.

Jones was found to have failed to carry out his professional duties, and particularly, that he had been guilty of violation involving the handling and commingling of trust account monies. Jones had previously received a public censure from the Board for failure to communicate with clients, neglect, failure to deliver monies held in trust and commingling of trust funds.

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F. Allen Kelly, a Kingston lawyer, was disbarred by order entered July 17, 1989. Kelly agreed to accept disbarment rather than go through a hearing. He was temporarily suspended from practice on February 3, 1989.

Kelly misappropriated $90,000 of a client's money for his own personal use. He had been granted the power of attorney in a real estate matter. In a separate matter he commingled the funds and properties of an estate and trust with his own personal funds and converted at least $100,000 for his own use.

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Patrick G. Kelly, of Knoxville, consented to disbarment following allegations of forgery, larceny in the handling of clients' funds, and misrepresentation to clients. He was convicted in Criminal Court on two counts of forgery and received a sentence of not less than three nor more than five years. The disbarment order was entered October 13, 1983.

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John C. Kersey, of Smyrna, was disbarred by consent order entered July 18, 1990. Kersey consented to disbarment because he could not successfully defend himself on the charges of misconduct filed against him.

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Thompson G. Kirkpatrick, of Memphis, was disbarred on October 23, 1995. Kirkpatrick was disbarred based upon the judgment that he was guilty of violating DR 1-102(A)(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6).

Kirkpatrick had been found guilty of a serious crime: possession of a controlled substance in violation of T.C.A. 39-17-418.

Kirkpatrick was temporarily suspended on November 16, 1994, for being found guilty of a serious crime.

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David W. Lanier, of Dyer County, was disbarred on April 24, 1998. He was previously suspended on February 17, 1993, for conviction of a serious crime involving his behavior toward employees of his court and persons with matters before his court while he was the Chancellor and Juvenile Court Judge for Dyer and Lake County. The hearing panel was referred to for final discipline, finding Lanier in violation of DR 1-102 and T.C.A. § 23-3-201(l)(5). It found that there were no mitigating circumstances as the Respondent had been practicing for many years and was aware of what was expected of him since the crimes he was convicted for were the essence of moral turpitude. Additionally, the panel requested that should Respondent seek reinstatement after five years, that the gravity of the charges and that lack of sense of decency be seriously considered.

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William M. Ligon, a Memphis attorney, was disbarred by order entered on February 14, 1994. The disbarment order is effective from March 24, 1992, the date Ligon was temporarily suspended by the Supreme Court. Ligon consented to disbarment because he could not successfully defend himself on certain of the charges alleged in complaints of misconduct.

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Cecil E. Lincoln, a Memphis lawyer, was disbarred by order entered September 24, 1990, upon the recommendation of a hearing committee. Lincoln was found to have a course of conduct whereby he misappropriated funds and embezzled funds which had been entrusted to him by clients and others.

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James Edwin Long, a Goodlettsville lawyer, was disbarred by order of the Supreme Court on October 18, 1989. Long consented to disbarment after being convicted of two fraudulent breach of trust indictments. He pled guilty to misappropriating funds of over $15,000 from the Frank C. Clement Foundation and approximately $38,000 from an estate he was handling.

Long was temporarily suspended on April 13, 1987, and his disbarment was made retroactive to that date.

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Michael G. Maddox, a Memphis attorney, was disbarred by Order entered on August 18, l993. A hearing panel found undisputed allegations of fraud, misappropriation of client funds, breach of fiduciary duty, conflict of interest, and abandonment of his law practice.
 
 

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Milton Manis, a Memphis lawyer, was disbarred by order entered December 2, 1988. The Court approved the Hearing Committee's findings and judgment which had been affirmed by the Chancery Court of Shelby County.

Manis was found to have misappropriated monies entrusted to him by his client over a three-year period for the payment of the client's taxes. The Committee found Manis guilty of unprofessional conduct, dishonesty, and conduct which rendered him unfit to be a member of the bar. The Committee further found that Manis' violations were serious, repeated, and involved moral turpitude; that his intent to misappropriate money entrusted to him was clear and his conduct was particularly aggravated and caused serious injury. Manis was ordered to make full restitution to his client in the amount of $26,000.
 
 

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Valerie Mann-Horton, a Memphis attorney, was disbarred by Order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, effective August 17, 1991. A Petition for Discipline was filed against Mann-Horton on April 3, 1991, and a default judgment recommending disbarment was entered against Mann-Horton by a Hearing Panel on July 17, 1991. Mann-Horton did not appeal the judgment.
 
 

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David Maxwell, a Sevierville lawyer, was disbarred by an Order issued by the Supreme Court on October 3, 1990. His license had been temporarily suspended since November 6, 1989.

Maxwell was charged with numerous violations of the Code of Professional Responsibility. Most of these charges related to neglect in his representation of several clients. Much of the neglect occurred when Maxwell abandoned his practice and his clients were unable to communicate with him to obtain the return of their files or a refund of their fees. Maxwell was accused also of fraud and willful disobedience of court orders. He had been found guilty of fraud and acting in bad faith by the U. S. District Court in Atlanta in the case of McKenna et al. V. Burke, No. 87-CV-911-RF/H. Maxwell was accused of receiving monies in trust on behalf of a client and failing to return said monies upon request; charging an illegal and excessive fee in a black lung case; and deceitfully writing checks to a client without sufficient funds to back them.

Maxwell did not answer the charges and a Hearing Committee of the Board of Professional Responsibility of the Supreme Court of Tennessee granted a default judgment. Said Hearing Committee subsequently recommended disbarment as the appropriate discipline. The Supreme Court approved the Hearing Committee's recommendation.
 
 

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Ervin McKay, of Shelby County, employed in the trust department of a bank, was indicted and entered a plea of guilty or nolo contendere of conspiracy to misapply or cause to be misapplied several thousands of dollars of the bank's money, and aiding and abetting the same in violation of 18 U.S.C. 371 and 656. Respondent upon conviction was immediately suspended from the practice of law pursuant to Rule 9 (14.4) and on March 24, 1977, consented to disbarment as final discipline.
 
 

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Terry L. McVay, of Memphis, was disbarred on October 23, 1995. The disbarment order is effective from January 13, 1994, the date on which McVay was first temporarily suspended. McVay was disbarred based upon an agreed order entered into by McVay.

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David E. Mead, a Nashville attorney, was disbarred by Order entered November 16, 1992. A hearing panel found that Mead had spent client funds in his trust account that did not belong to him. Mead also borrowed money from a client and told the client that the client would retain a security interest in collateral owned by Mead. Mead later gave a security interest in the same collateral to a bank. When Mead defaulted, the bank recovered the collateral because it had a properly filed security instrument. Mead also made misrepresentations to an individual regarding a private school business Mead owned. Mead had previously been suspended for six months in 1985 for similar business misrepresentations.

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Samuel B. Miller, II, of Johnson City, was disbarred on October 22, 1997. Since July 5, 1996, Miller's law license was suspended. After a petition for discipline was filed, Miller and Disciplinary Counsel entered into a plea agreement in which Miller agreed to his disbarment for commingling personal funds and for misappropriating monies from an escrow account at his firm which was for real estate closings. Additionally, Miller had misappropriated monies belonging to his firm or his partners. He was found to be in violation of DR 1-102, DR 9-102 and T.C.A. § 23-3-201(3) and (5). Aggravating factors include Miller's prior private admonition involving a conflict of interest issue in which Miller was admonished for violating DR 1-102, DR 5-105, DR 7-102 and DR 7-104.

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Eddie Montgomery, a Nashville attorney, was disbarred by the Supreme Court of Tennessee on January 27, 1991. The disbarment was retroactive to July 21, 1988, the date he was suspended from the

practice of law.

Montgomery received monies in trust largely as a result of his real estate closing business. He converted these funds to personal use and, as a result, there was a substantial loss of money, most of which was insured through Stewart Title, of Houston. The Board filed a Petition for Discipline, and Montgomery pled nolo contendere to said petition.

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David P. Murray, of Madison County, was charged in a petition for discipline with attempting to obtain a commutation of sentence or pardon for a client by passing money and using his influence with the Governor's office and also a conflict of interest in an adoption or child custody matter. He filed an affidavit pursuant to Rule 9, Section 15 (disbarment by consent) and on July 26, 1982, the court entered an order removing him from the rolls of practicing attorneys.

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A. Donovan Osborne, a Bristol attorney, was disbarred by Order entered on December 9, 1994. A Petition for Discipline was filed against Osborne in the spring of 1994, charging Osborne with neglect and misrepresentation. Osborne abandoned his law practice and disappeared, so the Supreme Court entered an order of temporary suspension on August 16, 1994. A hearing was held in which Osborne did not appear. The hearing panel recommended disbarment.

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Gary London Pagels, of Shelby County, was indicted and charged with conspiracy to transport more than two tons of marijuana from Columbia, South America into the continental United States. After two trials resulting in hung juries, Respondent entered a plea of guilty to unlawful possession of a quantity of marijuana in violation of 21 U.S.C. 812 (c) and 844 for which he received a six-month sentence. Pagels was immediately suspended from practice upon his plea and conviction. A Petition to Determine Final Discipline was filed. Respondent petitioned to be transferred to disability inactive status because of alleged mental infirmity and inability to defend himself. The Hearing Panel determined that Respondent should not be placed on disability inactive status and that the extent of final discipline imposed should be disbarment. The Supreme Court approved the determination and entered the Order of Disbarment on May 9, 1980.

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John R. Parker, a Nashville attorney, was disbarred by order entered November 6, 1987. Parker was accused of embezzlement of $24,595 in trust funds held in trust for the F.S.L.I.C. and of altering deeds and deeds of trust in transactions involving himself, The Bank of Bellevue, First Southern Bank, and others. Parker pled guilty to the petition for discipline.

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Mike Boots Parker, of Knoxville, was disbarred on February 21, 1997.

Mr. Parker was indicted by the Knox County Grand Jury. After a trial before the Knox County Criminal Court, Parker was found guilty of a facilitation of aggravated robbery relative to the armed robbery of Pizza Hut in Knox County on February 17, 1994.

After the Supreme Court denied Parker's appeal, he agreed to disbarment. The disbarment is retroactive to March 22, 1993, the date of the original suspension of Parker's license.

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Walter Parsons, whose last known law office was in Nashville, was disbarred by order entered August 18, 1988. Parsons never filed an answer to the formal charges brought against him nor did he appear at the hearing before the Hearing Panel.

The Court approved the Hearing Committee's order that reinstatement of Parsons' law license would be conditioned upon Parsons' reimbursement of monies owed his client.

Parsons had collected $880.52 on behalf of his client. He indicated in a letter to his client that the $488.70 owed to the client from that collection was attached. However, Parsons actually never mailed the check and converted the monies to his personal use. He also commingled personal funds with trust funds in his Trust Account.

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James S. Patrick, Jr., of Davidson County, was disbarred on September 14, 1981, pursuant to a hearing panel's findings that he had failed to preserve the identity of funds and property delivered to him by third parties for the use and benefit of a client and misappropriated the funds to his own use. He also neglected a legal matter entrusted to him and engaged in conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice by failing to file an appeal on behalf of the client. In another matter he willfully failed to file an appellate brief on behalf of his clients which resulted in his also being suspended from practice in Court of Criminal Appeals for one year. The hearing panel noted that Patrick had been previously suspended from the practice of law in 1972 and reinstated in 1974 with a two-year probationary period.

Another order of disbarment was entered September 14, 1981, against Patrick pursuant to Disciplinary Counsel's appeal of a Public Censure recommendation by a hearing panel. In this case the Chancery Court recommended disbarment after finding that Patrick had accepted an attorney fee to reduce the bond of a client in jail and then never contacted the client even though he may have made some effort to reduce the bond; failed to properly account for the receipt and disposition of funds and assets of his client, and failed to keep sufficient records to give an accurate accounting to his client; and neglected to properly keep another client's physical evidence in a safe place. The Chancery Court found no dishonesty but that Patrick was unable or unwilling to conform to the standards imposed upon lawyers as conditions for the privilege to practice and that while none of the matters taken alone are of great magnitude, taken together they evidence a chronic pattern of misconduct.

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Wendell Lee Payne, a Chattanooga lawyer, has been disbarred from the practice of law by order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, effective March 12, 1992. A Petition for Discipline was filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility against Payne on July 24, 1992, alleging misappropriation of clients' monies and neglect of their cases. Payne did not respond to the petition and a default judgment was entered November 19, 1991, by a Hearing Panel of the Board. Payne did not file an appeal of the Hearing Panel's Judgment.

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Martin Arnold Peebles, Jr., was disbarred on December 6, 1988, as a result of his criminal conviction. He was convicted on April 29, 1988, of representing to a client that he could bribe a judge on the Tennessee Court of Appeals for $5000 to render a decision favorable to that client.

Peebles' law license had been suspended since May 5, 1988, following his conviction. He subsequently consented to disbarment.

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Noble E. Pepper, Sr., a Nashville attorney, was disbarred on May 8, 1989. In February 1988, Pepper disappeared with his wife and two children. He did not notify his clients or the attorneys with whom he shared an office about his decision to leave or of his whereabouts. He refunded no fees nor did he make sure his clients were protected by new counsel.

Prior to his disappearance, Pepper misappropriated for his personal use approximately $185,000 held in trust for three clients. He settled a case without the knowledge and consent of a fourth client, forged that client's name to a settlement check in the amount of $325,000 and misappropriated this money to his personal use.

Pepper did not make an appearance nor did he file an answer to charges brought against him.

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Herbert Sharland Phillips, Jr., a Memphis attorney, was disbarred by order entered January 21, 1988. The judgment of the Hearing Committee found that Phillips had misappropriated money belonging to his client; had caused injury to his client; had failed and refused to respond to the allegations against him; and had shown a total disregard concerning the privilege granted to practice law.

Phillips had collected over $10,000 on certain accounts for his client, a licensed collection agency, beginning in 1981. At a meeting with his client in 1986, the client discovered that Phillips had failed to remit the collected funds. Phillips signed a letter of agreement from his client stating that he would remit $7,211.32 to the client immediately. However, Phillips never remitted any money to his client.

As a result of his disbarment in Tennessee, reciprocal disbarment in Mississippi was entered by order March 9, 1988.

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Steven Guy Phillips, of Memphis, consented to disbarment upon his plea of guilty in the Criminal Court to simple possession of marijuana after being indicted for attempting to introduce a controlled substance into the County Jail and possession of a controlled substance on County Jail grounds. The order of disbarment was entered on May 1, 1984.

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James Lynn Price, a Bristol attorney, was disbarred by the Supreme Court of Tennessee by Order entered May 15, 1991.

Formal charges were filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility against Price. These charges were heard by a Hearing Committee of the Board of Professional Responsibility which ultimately made the disbarment recommendation.

Price was charged with neglecting the cases of several clients. He further failed to adequately communicate with them and to refund unearned fees.

The Hearing Committee found as aggravating factors, in determining discipline, that Price has been disciplined for similar misconduct in the past and that he didn't appear at his hearing.

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Jackson Leroy Quinton, of Chattanooga, misappropriated approximately $80,000 for his own use and benefit from several estates on which he served as conservator, guardian or attorney. He consented to a disbarment which was entered on August 29, 1983.

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Jesse Ray, of Elizabethton, was disbarred by Supreme Court order issued September 9, 1985. Ray was convicted on October 24, 1984, by the Carter County Criminal Court for statutory rape.

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Mickey J. Ridings, of Brentwood, was disbarred for violation of DR 1-102(A)(1)(3)(4)(5)(6) on October 2, 1996. Ridings was immediately suspended on February 13, 1995, based on his conviction of eighty-four counts of mail fraud in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Ridings failed to answer the petition for final discipline and a Default Judgment was entered.

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Richard Eugene Rudesill, Williamson County, was disbarred on September 12, 1979, as a result of three charges. In the Baxter matter he purchased 52 acres of an incompetent through a Chancery Court sale. One-third of the purchase price was paid in cash and the balance was payable in two equal notes due in one and two years. Rudesill sold portions of the property to others representing the property was clear and failed to apply the proceeds to the lien notes. Certain purported partial releases were put to record by Rudesill or his agent, which allowed him to sell these portions of the property when, in fact, the releases were forgeries. The Hearing Panel found that Rudesill should have known the releases were fraudulent and that he willfully and knowingly practiced a fraud upon the Court and the people who purchased property from him.

In the Walker matter, Rudesill advised a client to encumber property owned by the client and client's family for more than 30 years in the amount of $250,000.00 so that it could not be taken to satisfy potential judgments of adverse parties. He prepared a fictitious Deed of Trust and Note for his client, which was executed and recorded for the purpose of defrauding creditors. In the Hall matter, Rudesill obtained a personal loan by leading the lender to believe that they had a first mortgage on two tracts of real estate given as security when, in fact, they only had a first mortgage on one tract which was unimproved and a second mortgage on the improved tract.

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Joseph E. Saperstein, a Nashville lawyer was disbarred from the practice of law in Tennessee on January 30, 1991, pursuant to an Order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. He has been in a suspended status since February 9, 1990, when the Court ordered his temporary suspension based upon violations of the Code of Professional Responsibility. Saperstein's disbarment resulted from formal charges brought against him by the Board of Professional Responsibility and the judgment of a Hearing Committee of the Board.

Saperstein was charged with numerous ethical violations, including the failure to represent clients and abandoning their legal matters after having been paid for such representation. The Board alleged he deceived his clients and misrepresented the status of their legal matters. Further, the Board charged that he repeatedly violated the Supreme Court's order of February 9, 1990, by failing to notify his clients, the various courts and others of his suspension from the practice of law and his inability to further represent clients.

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Clay N. Saunders, formerly of Shelby County, qualified as executor of an estate in 1978. He collected the cash assets of the estate of approximately $38,000 and has absconded. He failed to account for the funds and converted them to his use. Petition for discipline was filed and he failed to respond. A hearing panel recommended disbarment which was entered by the Court on January 17, 1983.

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Frank N. Seal, of Hamilton County, consented to disbarment pursuant to Rule 9 (15) after charges of misappropriating estate funds of approximately $95,000 and making false accountings to the Court regarding the funds. The disbarment order was entered April 22, 1982.

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William Shepard, of Memphis, was disbarred by order entered January 24, 1990. The court approved the hearing committee's findings and judgment that Shepard received funds for a client which were to be held in trust for the client. However Shepard did not disburse the funds to the client but misappropriates the funds for his own use.

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Stanley H. Sidicane, Davidson County, drafted and prepared a will for a client. He named himself as devisee of 25 acres of real estate and beneficiary of monies derived from another estate. His then girlfriend, later his wife, was one of the attesting witnesses and the other attesting witness was a friend of long standing. The client was disturbed and bereaved over the recent loss of his companion and was physically shaky when the will was allegedly executed. Within two weeks the client complained of severe stomach pains, tried to vomit and was dead on arrival at the hospital. The purported will was not executed by the client, was a forgery and a fraudulent document which Sidicane fraudulently prepared, produced and proffered for probate. Sidicane had been previously admonished in February 1975 regarding his actions in attempting to intimidate out of state counsel from making an appearance pro hac vice and attempting to obtain a default judgment. Sidicane was disbarred by order of the Supreme Court dated May 29, 1979.

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Thomas Edward Sisk, entered a guilty plea to an indictment charging him with conspiracy and a pattern of racketeering activity in computations of sentences and stay of extraditions in exchange for money while Legal Counsel to Governor Blanton. A petition to determine final discipline pursuant to Rule 9, Section 14 was filed, and he consented to a disbarment which was entered by the Court on March 25, 1983.

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Carleton W. Smith, of Greene County, was involved in nine separate incidents. He allowed the statute to run on an EEOC job discrimination claim; in several instances assured clients that actions had been filed and set for trial when in fact they had not been filed; fraudulently obtained a divorce judgment from his wife; appropriated law partnership fees to his own personal use; solicited substantial monies, a portion to be used as a bribe, to obtain a liquor license; and was convicted of a felony for misappropriation of funds from his father's estate. A hearing panel recommended disbarment which was entered by the Supreme Court on April 2, 1981.

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Marshall Scott Smith, of Trenton, was disbarred on July 7, 1995. He had been suspended on June 2, 1993, after being convicted of the crime of official misconduct. The hearing committee found Smith had been found guilty in a case involving a serious crime, to wit: unlawfully and feloniously, while acting as a Special Judge, with intent to obtain a benefit, he intentionally and knowingly committed an act relating to his employment of office as a judge which constitutes an unauthorized exercise of official power, in violation of T.C.A. 39-16-402.

Smith's actions constituted violations of DR 1-102(A)(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6) and DR 8-101(A)(2)(3); DR 9-101(C); T.C.A. 39-16-402; and T.C.A. 23-3-201(1)(5).

The committee further found the following mitigating and aggravating factors: Smith was guilty of a felony; Smith committed the crime while acting as a special judge, thus as a public servant; Smith acted with a dishonest and selfish motive; Smith had a prior suspension of 18 months in 1985; his acts show a pattern of misconduct; Smith has been shown to be experienced in the practice of law, having been licensed since 1981.

The respondent offered evidence as to his alcoholism, its affect on his judgment which led to his crime of official misconduct, his voluntary treatment for alcoholism, and subsequent recovery. The hearing committee unanimously decided that neither Smith's alcoholism not its treatment was a mitigating factor.

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Harry Parker Stanley was disbarred following an opinion of the Supreme Court on October 4, 1982. The published opinion, Stanley V. Board of Professional Responsibility 640 S.W.2d 210, affirmed the judgment of disbarment by the Hearing Panel and the Circuit Court upon findings that he engaged in three separate episodes involving preparation of usurious notes, lending money to a client without full disclosure, failing to deal honestly and candidly with clients, representing both victim and defendant in a criminal matter, and incompetent representation and conflicts of interest.

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Michael Starling, of Nashville, (who at one time also had an office in Knoxville) was disbarred by Supreme Court order issued September 9, 1985. Starling presented to his clients a valid a court order purporting to be a final decree in their divorce case, when he knew such decree to be false. Both the husband and wife, relying on Mr. Starling's representations that they were divorced, remarried other people.

Starling represented to another client that he had filed a bankruptcy petition on that client's behalf when Starling knew no petition had been filed. Starling in a third case had misrepresented to a divorce case client that the judge had signed her divorce order and that the client was divorced, when Starling knew that no divorce had been granted. The panel finally found numerous instances of Starling's failure to adequately communicate with his clients, and some instances of neglect by Starling.

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Floyd Derwood Starnes, of Lauderdale County, was disbarred on February 11, 1982, after having been indicted for misappropriating funds while serving as Clerk and Master and convicted of attempt to commit a felony after a jury trial.

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Robert David Strickland, who formerly practiced law in Jackson, was temporarily suspended and is now disbarred. Strickland remained suspended until the order disbarring him was entered by the Supreme Court on March 18, 1997. Strickland submitted a conditional Plea consenting to disbarment and admitting his guilt of violating DR 1-102 (A) (1) (5) (6) ; DR 2 -110 (A) (2) ; DR 6-101(A) (3) and DR 7-101(A) (1) (2) (3).

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Marshall B. Stuart, Jr., of Dickson, was disbarred on March 14, 1996. Stuart consented to disbarment because he could not successfully defend himself on the charges alleged in complaints of misconduct filed against him.

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Raymond Ellis Taylor, Jr., a former Assistant District Attorney of Dayton, Tennessee, was disbarred upon recommendation of the Hearing Panel after his conviction of First Degree Murder and Aggravated Battery and concurrent sentences of life and twenty years by the Circuit Court of Marion County, Florida. The disbarment order was entered on February 24, 1984.

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Bretran A. Thompson, of Memphis, was disbarred on January 4, 1996. Thompson was temporarily suspended on September 13, 1993, in this same matter.

Mr. Thompson's disbarment was based on his theft of client funds in five matters. Each of the thefts involved money entrusted to Thompson for client in personal injury cases.

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Michael G. Tidwell, of Nashville, was ordered disbarred by the Tennessee Supreme Court on May 22, 1986. Tidwell represented an estate in probate and converted to his own use a considerable amount of funds from that estate in excess of $32,000.

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Harvey Guyton Van Dell, an attorney licensed in Tennessee, was disbarred by Order entered on July 28, 1993. The Tennessee disbarment was reciprocal discipline to his disbarment in California.

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Gary F. Verego, of Memphis, was disbarred on April 10, 1995. He was temporarily suspended on June 8, 1994.

Judgment by default was entered by the hearing committee. The judgments found that Verego failed to communicate with clients; failed to communicate with the State's disciplinary committee regarding complaints of ethical misconduct; misappropriated clients' funds; neglected client matters; abandoned clients; failed to return clients' funds upon request; engaged in conflicts of interest; practiced law after being temporarily suspended for failure to complete his CLE requirements; practiced law after being temporarily suspended for failure to answer complaints of misconduct; failed to apprise his clients that he was temporarily suspended, as required by Supreme Court Rule 9; misrepresented to the court the status of his license; failed to return unearned retainers and fraudulently accepted money for services, when Verego knew he could not properly represent the client due to his suspension.

Aggravating circumstances were present in that Verego had substantial experience in the practice of law, having practiced since 1981; that he acted with dishonest and selfish motive in accepting monies from clients, failing to do the work for those funds and failing to refund the funds after it became clear he did not intend to do the work; that Verego continued to refuse to acknowledge the wrongful nature of his conduct; that his conduct gave evidence to multiple offenses; that his conduct showed indifference to making restitution; that he showed bad faith by intentionally failing to respond to the state disciplinary agency; that he intentionally failed to comply with the order which suspended him by continuing to practice law and continuing to misrepresent to prospective clients that he was able to practice law, as well as taking fees after the date of suspension; and that he engaged in bad faith obstruction of the disciplinary proceedings by intentionally failing to comply with the temporary suspension of his license by failing to notify his clients and to substitute counsel in pending cases.

The hearing panel found that Verego should make restitution to all complainants as a condition precedent to reinstatement.

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Larry W. Weems, of Greeneville, consented to disbarment after entering a plea of guilty in Federal Court of conspiring to distribute marijuana. The disbarment order was entered June 16, 1983.

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Michael L. West, of Hamilton County, was disbarred by consent on January 11, 1982, after having been charged with an escrow violation.

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William S. Williford, of Gainesboro, was disbarred by order entered April 30, 1987, upon recommendation of a Hearing Panel. Williford converted to his personal use almost $63,000 held in trust on behalf of a client, various medical providers, and an insurance company. Further, he converted almost $5,000 belonging to another client in a victim's compensation matter, and charged the client a fee in excess of that permitted by statute. Williford has made restitution to the second Client. Any reinstatement was conditioned by the Hearing Panel upon complete restitution to the injured parties.

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Kelvin H. Willis, a Memphis lawyer, was disbarred by the Supreme Court on February 6, 1989. He had been summarily and temporarily suspended from practice on August 12, 1988, based on allegations that he had as a course of conduct misappropriated money entrusted to him regarding closing of real estate transactions.

Willis' suspension and disbarment resulted from numerous complaints filed with the Board. He failed to cooperate with the Board, failed to respond to the allegations made against him, and failed to appear at the hearing and offer any explanation concerning the allegations that he had misappropriated in excess of $150,000.00.

Ordinarily an attorney may apply for reinstatement after five years. However, the Court found that Willis would not be eligible for Reinstatement after five years unless he complied with other conditions imposed by the hearing panel and Court which included proof that he had made full restitution of all funds misappropriated by him.

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Steve A. Wood, of Nashville, was disbarred on January 21, 1997. A hearing panel entered a Default Judgment of Disbarment.

Mr. Wood was disbarred for his conduct in four separate bankruptcy cases. Wood filed bankruptcy for each client and abandoned the clients after receiving payment. He demonstrated a pattern of neglect and failure to communicate with clients. He failed to refund any unearned fees. The clients were prejudiced by Mr. Wood's conduct. Mr. Wood violated DR 1-102(A) (1) (5) and (6); DR 2-106(A); DR 2-110(A) (3); DR 6-101(A) (2) and (3); and DR 7-101 (A) (1) (2) (3).

Mr. Wood's conduct is aggravated by the fact that he received prior discipline for similar misconduct and by his failure to respond to disciplinary complaints.

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William Parker Wright, Jr., of Knoxville, was disbarred by an order dated August 19, 1997. Wright plead guilty on December 3, 1993 to knowingly making false statements to banks in violation of Title 18 U.S.C. § 1014, and for unauthorized and improperly securing investment of escrow funds on three occasions. He has been voluntarily suspended since February 19, 1993 and has been temporarily suspended by the Board since December 15, 1993. Wright filed a conditional plea of guilty with the Board for violating DR 1-102, and T.C.A. § 23-3-201(3) and (5), which both the Board and the Supreme Court accepted. His disbarment period began as of February 19, 1993 via an agreement approved by the Board.

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Barry George Zepke, a Knoxville attorney, was disbarred by order entered August 25, 1987. Zepke had been suspended from the practice of law in December 1984 following his conviction in the Criminal Court of Knox County for fraudulent breach of trust which resulted in his being sentenced to the state penitentiary for not less than six nor more than ten years.

Zepke had been suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court on two previous occasions for ethical misconduct. In October 1984, he had been convicted of misappropriating and embezzling money and property of a client for his own use.

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