'Going where no dog has gone before -- and without a leash'
THE PUTNAM PIT
[No bull]
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Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury's May 2000 audit of
the Board of Professional Responsibility

Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility's
2001 annual report (Nov. 1, 2001)

Official disciplinary actions against Tennessee lawyers by the 
Tennessee Supreme Court's Board of Professional Responsibility

2006 Alphabetical

Culp, Walter Ray a Franklin lawyer, was summarily suspended from the practice of law by the Tennessee Supreme Court on April 3, 2006.  Mr. Culp pled guilty to a serious crime, i.e., the offense of extortion, on February 14, 2006.

2006 Chronological

Culp, Walter Ray a Franklin lawyer, was summarily suspended from the practice of law by the Tennessee Supreme Court on April 3, 2006.  Mr. Culp pled guilty to a serious crime, i.e., the offense of extortion, on February 14, 2006.

Jump to 2005 Alphabetical

2005 Chronological

Cohn, William A., a Cordova attorney, was suspended by the Supreme Court for 90 days. (Jan. 10, 2005)

Gilmer, Michael E., a Columbia lawyer, was suspended by the Supreme Court (Jan. 13, 2005)

Richter, Timothy Joseph, a Springfield lawyer, has been reinstated by the Tennessee Supreme Court after taking disability inactive status in 2003 (Jan. 24, 2005)

Brown, Gloria Jean, a Knoxville lawyer, had her law license suspended by the Supreme Court of Tennessee for one year. The suspension is based on two petitions for discipline filed by Disciplinary Counsel pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court. Ms. Brown did not file an answer to either petition and a default judgment was granted. Ms. Brown was retained to represent Rita Ellis in a criminal matter.  She neglected her case and failed to adequately communicate with her.  She was cited in contempt by the Anderson County Chancery Court for her failure to appear at a hearing in said court.  She also failed to appear on behalf of her client, Patricia Lynn Smith, in Loudon County General Sessions Court.  In several cases, the courts and opposing counsel were unable to contact Ms. Brown.  Letters were returned or unanswered.  Similarly she did return her phone calls. Ms. Brown was also guilty of other allegations which were not charges of neglect.  She filed a frivolous action against employees of the Domestic Violence Crisis Center in Lenoir City.   Ms. Brown further acted in a bizarre manner by cursing and/or screaming at opposing counsel and staff of the Disciplinary Counsel.  Her license was suspended for her failure to obtain sufficient continuing legal education hours, but she continued to practice law. (Jan. 26, 2005)

Rather, James L., a Knoxville lawyer, was censured by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility for assisting in the unauthorized practice of law. (Jan. 31, 2005)

Mask, John Carlin Jr., a lawyer from Hardeman County, has been disbarred by the Tennessee Supreme Court for misappropriation of client funds, posing a threat of "irreparable harm" to the public, misconduct, incompetence, failing to zealously represent clients, failure to represent within the bounds of law and engaging in the unauthorized practice of law. The hearing panel also found that aggravating circumstances existed because of the length of time Mr. Mask had practiced law (26) years); his prior history of unethical conduct, his dishonesty and his failure to make restitution.  Furthermore, the Hearing Panel found there were no mitigating circumstances.  Neither Mr. Mask nor the Board appealed the Hearing Panel’s Findings. (Feb. 1, 2005)

Arnold, Rebecca C., a Memphis lawyer, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law by order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  The Court suspended Arnold based upon a petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that she failed to substantially comply with a contract she entered into with the Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program. (Feb. 3, 2005)

Nanney, Douglas P., a Hickman County attorney, was suspended from the practice of law in by the Tennessee Supreme Court for a period of two years, to be followed by a period of indefinite suspension. Nanney’s suspension resulted from Nanney pleading guilty to a violation of 40-35-313, Tennessee Code Annotated, a Class E Felony, possession of drug paraphernalia. (Feb. 3, 2005)

Temple, Steven Monroe, of Memphis, was suspended from the practice of law by the Supreme Court of Tennessee for one year retroactive to October 28, 2003, the date upon which he was first suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Temple abandoned his law practice without notice to his clients, charged excessive fees, failed to withdraw from his clients’ cases when he could no longer represent the clients, failed to adequately communicate with his clients and failed to return unused portions of retainer fees.  As a result of his failure to respond, Temple’s law license has been temporarily suspended since October 28, 2003. Disciplinary Counsel filed a petition for discipline and a supplemental petition for discipline pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  Temple agreed to enter into a conditional guilty plea to the petitions in exchange for a one year suspension retroactive to October 28, 2003 the date upon which he was first suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court and Temple agreed to make restitution. (February 3, 2005)

Thomas, Susanna Laws, a Newport lawyer, had her law license suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court of Tennessee Laws failed to respond to the Board of Professional Responsibility concerning two complaints of misconduct. Because Ms. Thomas was suspended on September 7, 2004, for failure to comply with her Continuing Legal Education requirements and on September 20, 2004, for failing to pay her annual registration fee to the Board of Professional Responsibility, she should already have met these requirements and should not have any existing clients or pending matters. (Feb. 4, 2005)

Bush, Charles E., of Clarksville, was transferred to disability inactive status. Mr. Bush's disability arises out of a medical condition which incapacitates him from continuing the practice of law. (Feb. 9, 2005)

Shaw, Clark L., of Nashville, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility for failing to take prompt action on behalf of a client’s request for a restraining order.  In addition, Shaw failed to promptly address a problem with an order that had been entered that was contrary to the Court’s original order.  The respondent did file a motion to amend this order which was eventually granted by the Court some months later.  The client also complained that Shaw failed to respond to his request for information.   Mr. Shaw also failed to provide the client with the requested itemized statement regarding Shaw’s bill. (February 11, 2005)

Officer, Albert F, III, of Cookeville, was reinstated to the practice of law by order of the Tennessee Supreme Court. Mr. Officer had been suspended by the Supreme Court on June 5, 2001, for three and one-half years retroactive to April 7, 1999, the date on which he had previously been temporarily suspended by the Supreme Court. Mr. Officer's license to practice law be reinstated on the stated conditions.  Mr. Officer has entered into a contract with Cookeville lawyer Martelia T. Crawford to serve as Practice Monitor for Mr. Officer. (February 18, 2005)

Ballentine, Emilia Green, of Memphis, was suspended from the practice of law for one year by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court, effective March 6, 2005.  Ballentine had previously been temporarily suspended from the practice of law on July 3, 2003 for failure to respond to a complaint of misconduct, and administratively suspended from the practice due to her failure to comply with the rule on mandatory continuing legal education on January 29, 2002. A petition for discipline was filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility against Ballentine on November 3, 2003 alleging that she continued to practice law at the Suskind, Susser firm through March of 2003 even though her law license had been in a continuous state of suspension since January 29, 2002 for failure to obtain mandatory minimum CLE.  When Ballentine failed to respond to the petition, a motion for default judgment was filed and granted against her on September 8, 2004.  (February 23, 2005)

Jessup, William Eugene, formerly a Chattanooga attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility, for charging a client an excessive fee.  Mr. Jessup was engaged in 1996 to enroll a foreign judgment and sue his client's ex-husband for contempt.  The case was highly contested.  Mr. Jessup was successful in obtaining judgment on behalf of his client.  Mr. Jessup charged a fee of in excess of $41,000.00 for time and expenses expended on the case, of which Mr. Jessup had been paid $17,418.00.  On May 18, 1998, Mr. Jessup filed suit against the client for the balance of his fees.  The client filed a counter-claim against Mr. Jessup claiming that Mr. Jessup had charged a clearly excessive fee for that type of case.  The case was tried before a jury on September 25, 2001, and the jury found that Mr. Jessup attempted to collect a clearly excessive fee. (March 4, 2005)

Whiteside, Thomas L., of Brentwood, was disbarred by order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Previously on January 28, 2004, the Supreme Court temporarily suspended Mr. Whiteside’s right to practice for failure to respond to a disciplinary complaint. A petition for discipline involving three disciplinary complaints was filed on June 28, 2004.  On August 12, 2004, a motion for default judgment on the petition for discipline was filed. The hearing panel found that the respondent abandoned his law practice, knowingly failed to perform services to clients and neglected legal matters of clients causing serious injury to his clients.  The hearing panel found that Whiteside took client funds under false pretenses and deceived his clients. (March 4, 2005)

Church, Christine Zellar, of Clarksville, Tennessee, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Church was given notice of this censure and did not request a hearing.  The Board censured Church for making unclear statements and failing to clarify facts to the Complainant’s current employer regarding whether the Complainant had been fired  by her two previous employers.  Church’s actions violate Rule 8.4(c) of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct and for these violations the Board censures Church.  The censure declares Church’s actions to be improper but does not limit her right to practice law. (March 7, 2005)

LaGuardia, Michael J., of Kingsport, received a public censure from the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility. Mr. LaGuardia self-reported to the Board. Mr. LaGuardia testified in a pre-trial deposition in his divorce case, wherein he stated that he purchased a Dodge Intrepid in June 2002.  He stated that he later sold it to “a neighbor and friend . . . Susan Carter.”  (Susan Carter became Mr. LaGuardia’s girlfriend a few months after the divorce began.)  Ms. Carter paid him nothing, but simply took over the payments on Mr. LaGuardia’s loan.  Mr. LaGuardia stated in the deposition that he entered into a financing arrangement to obtain the car for the $13,000 purchase price.  He stated that the dealer financed it “a hundred percent . . . I never had to put a dime on it.”  At the trial, Mr. LaGuardia stated that the dealer did not finance 100 percent of the purchase price but that Mr. LaGuardia had put down $5,700 and therefore had an interest in the car for this amount.  He further admitted that he did not tell the truth in the deposition. Mr. LaGuardia has thereby violated Rules of Professional Conduct Nos. 3.3, 4.4, and 8.4.  He did not request a hearing.  This censure does not affect Mr. LaGuardia’s ability to continue to practice law. (March 18, 2005) 

Woodby, David E., a Bristol lawyer, was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. On February 16, 2000, Mr. Woodby’s law license was suspended for noncompliance with CLE.  It was reinstated on January 10, 2001.  On September 24, 2003, it was suspended again for noncompliance with CLE. Since September 24, 2003, Mr. Woodby continued to practice law.  He had some bankruptcy cases before Bankruptcy Judge Martha Parsons.  She discovered that he had never been admitted to practice before the Eastern District of Tennessee Federal Court and instructed him to apply.  He indicated to her that he would.  Mr. Woodby continued to file bankruptcy cases, but did not apply for admission.  Judge Parsons issued a show cause order in four of his bankruptcy cases.  At the Show Cause hearing on February 24, 2003, Mr. Woodby indicated to Judge Parsons that he was in the process of obtaining a certificate of good standing from the State of Tennessee and requested additional time to complete the admission practice. On or about March 10, 2003, Chapter 13 Trustee, Gwendolyn M. Kerney, received a notice of levy on Mr. Woodby in the amount of $64, 270.95 compelling her to remit all fees due him as debtor’s attorney to the IRS.  Ms. Kerney checked with the Board and discovered that Mr. Woodby’s license had been suspended since the previous September. (March 9, 2005)

Fitzgerald, Michael D.,  a Memphis lawyer,  was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. Fitzgerald failed to keep trust account records as required by Section 29 of Supreme Court Rule 9 and Rule 1.15 of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct making it impossible to determine if Fitzgerald was handling trust funds correctly. (April 13, 2005)

Boyd, Arch B III, of Memphis, was on the receiving end of a public censure from the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility. He did not request a hearing.  Respondent neglected his legal matter, failed to adequately communicate with his client and failed to refund any monies after being terminated.  The Board issued the public censure on the condition that Boyd submit the fee matter to the Memphis Bar Association Fee Dispute Committee to determine whether a refund is due and if so, in what amount.  The Board determined that Boyd’s conduct was in violation of DR 1-102(A)(1)(5)(6); DR 6-101(A)(3) and DR 7-101(A)(1)(2)(3)(4) of the Code of Professional Responsibility.  A public censure is a form of discipline that declares the conduct of the lawyer improper but does not limit the lawyer’s right to practice law. (April 14, 2005)

Stinnett, Jeffrey Andrew, a Chattanooga attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Mr. Stinnett engaged in the practice of law during a period after his license to practice law was administratively suspended on September 24, 2003, for failing to comply with continuing legal education requirements. (April 19, 2005)

Rainwater, John Earl, of Knoxville, was temporarily suspended from the practice of law by order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee for failing to respond to a complaint of misconduct. Mr. Rainwater may for good cause request dissolution or modification of this temporary suspension by petition to the Supreme Court.  This temporary suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the Supreme Court. (April 22, 2005.)

Schwarz, Earle J., a Memphis lawyer, was issued a public censure by the Board of Professional Responsibility.  He did not request a hearing.  A complaint was filed against Schwarz based on a declaration filed by him in a habeas corpus action that Schwarz willfully neglected his representation of his client.  Schwarz neglected his client’s legal matter in a death penalty case and filed a declaration and subsequent habeas corpus proceeding. (April 25, 2005)

Hornick, Joseph L., of Dickson, had a run in with the Supreme Court of Tennessee, and Hornick lost. The Court entered an Order suspending the law license of Joseph L. Hornick for a period of forty-five (45) days beginning July 1, 2005. The Board of Professional Responsibility filed a Petition for Discipline against Hornick pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  The Board’s Petition charged Hornick with neglect and failure to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in filing a client’s divorce and then paying the client’s court cost.  The Petition also charged Hornick with misinforming his client regarding payment of the court cost.  The Board of Professional Responsibility filed a Supplemental Petition for Discipline against Hornick which alleged that Hornick had made false and misleading statements to the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Hornick submitted a Conditional Guilty Plea in exchange for a stated form of discipline.  The discipline Hornick agreed to, which was approved by a Hearing Panel, the Board and the Court, was that Hornick would be suspended for forty-five (45) days; and have a practice monitor for a period of one (1) year who shall provide monthly reports to the Board.  (May 12, 2005)

Barnwell, Howard Brownlow, a Chattanooga attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility after voluntarily dismissing a case for which he was representing a client.  Mr. Barnwell failed to re-file the case within the one year permitted by the savings statute.  Mr. Barnwell's conduct violated DR 1-102(A)(1)(6), DR 6-101(A)(2), and DR 7-101(A)(1)(3) of the Code of Professional Responsibility. (May 16, 2005)

Crowe, Denvil F, Jr.,  a Nashville lawyer, was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility , for failure to contact his Chapter 13 Bankruptcy clients directly to inform them how to contact him after closing his Nashville office and relocating to Tupelo, Mississippi.  Crowe violated Rules 1.1; 1.2; 1.3; 1.4; 1.5 and 8.4 of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct.  The imposition of this censure declares Crowe’s actions to be improper ethical conduct, but does not limit his right to practice law. (May 19, 2005)

Fisher, James B, Jr., of Memphis, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility on .  The censure was issued by the Board pursuant to Rule 9, Section 8 of the Rules of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Fisher did not request a hearing on the matter. A complaint alleging ethical misconduct was filed against Fisher and the Board’s investigation revealed that he had consistently used his IOLTA escrow account for a very large number of personal transactions unrelated to his law practice from January, 1998 through July of 2004. Fisher ceased this activity in August of 2004. The Board found no actual misappropriation of entrusted funds on Fisher’s part, and found somewhat mitigating his acceptance of responsibility and his acknowledgment that such commingling was ethically improper.  Fisher’s substantial experience in the practice of law (licensed to practice in 1978) was considered an aggravating circumstance in this matter. (May 25, 2005)

Dolan, John Louis, a Memphis attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in Tennessee by Order of the Supreme Court.   The Court suspended Dolan based upon a Petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that he failed to respond to Disciplinary Counsel or to the Board concerning a complaint of misconduct. This suspension was issued pursuant to Section 4.3 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9.  Dolan is precluded from accepting any new clients after May 26, 2005, and is also precluded from representing present clients after June 25, 2005.  After June 25, 2005, Dolan shall furthermore not use any indicia of lawyer, legal assistant or law clerk, nor maintain a presence where the practice of law is conducted. Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 requires Dolan to notify by registered or certified mail all clients being represented in pending matters; all co-counsel and opposing counsel of the Supreme Court’s Order suspending him.  Section 18 also requires Dolan to deliver to all clients any papers or property to which they are entitled. This suspension shall remain in effect until it is dissolved or amended by Order of the Supreme Court. (May 26, 2005)

Slavin, Edward A., Jr., a suspended St. Augustine, Fla. attorney, was found in willful contempt of court by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. He was sentenced to ten (10) days in jail and fined $50.00. Slavin’s law license was suspended on August 27, 2004 for a period of two (2) years.  The suspension order specifically mandated that Slavin comply in all respects with Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 and specifically with Section 18 regarding the obligations and responsibilities of suspended attorneys. Disciplinary Counsel filed a Petition for Contempt charging Slavin with contemptuous conduct as follows:

            1.         That Slavin had failed to comply with the Supreme Court’s Order of suspension;

            2.         That Slavin had entered his appearance representing clients after having been suspended by Order of this Court on August 27, 2004; and

            3.         That Slavin has failed to comply with Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 as ordered August 27, 2004, by failing to notify opposing counsel and clients of his suspension and by failing to file an affidavit to that affect.

The Court found that Slavin’s failure or refusal to comply with the Order to file the affidavit required by Section 18.8 of Supreme Court Rule 9 was willful and constituted willful contempt of the Court beyond a reasonable doubt. (June 17, 2005)

Cain, Leroy, Jr., of Nashville, has been suspended from the practice of law for nine months by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. The Court also ordered Cain to make restitution of $150 to one client and restitution in the amount of $415 to a second client within thirty (30) days of the Supreme Court’s Order. The Supreme Court suspended Cain for Cain’s continued practice of law while on suspension.  Cain was suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court on December 17, 2002 for non-compliance with his continuing legal education requirements, however, Cain continued practicing law after being suspended.  Cain failed to withdraw after being suspended; made misrepresentations to and failed to adequately communicate with clients, courts, opposing counsel and the Board of Professional Responsibility; accepted fees while suspended; disclosed client confidences and neglected client matters. On July 7, 2005 until April 7, 2006, Cain shall not use any indicia of lawyer, legal assistant or law clerk nor maintain a presence where the practice of law is conducted.  Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 requires Cain to notify all clients that are being represented in pending matters; all counsel and opposing counsel of the Supreme Court’s Order suspending him.  Section 18 of Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court, also requires Cain to deliver to all clients any papers or property to which they are entitled. (June 27, 2005)

Milligan, James L., Jr., a Knoxville lawyer, has been suspended from the practice of law for two years by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Disciplinary Counsel of the Board of Professional Responsibility had filed a petition for discipline as to Mr. Milligan.  The petition was heard before a hearing panel of the Board, which recommended disbarment. Mr. Milligan appealed. The Knoxville Chancery Court (William Inman, Sr. serving as special judge) recommended Mr. Milligan receive a Public Censure.  Disciplinary Counsel appealed to the Supreme Court, with the Court deciding to suspend Mr. Milligan’s law license for two (2) years. The Court found that Mr. Milligan misappropriated trust funds.  He overdrew on his trust account 24 times in one year.  In an eight month period he incurred overdraft charges in the amount of $766.  He wrote a check on his trust account to Attorney G. Turner Howard, for Mr. Howard’s work on a case that had been settled which was returned for insufficient funds.  In the case of Michael Overton, Mr. Milligan deposited in his checking account $50,000 on May 7, 1999.  Mr. Milligan did not make a disbursement to Mr. Overton in the amount of $29,924.21 until May 28, 2002.  During this period of time, Mr. Milligan’s trust account dipped beneath $29,924.21 indicating a misappropriation of funds.  Mr. Milligan admitted using client funds before settlement funds were deposited in his trust account and depositing client funds in non-trust accounts.  The Court found that Mr. Milligan thereby violated DR1-102(A), 2-106(A), 7-101(A), 9-102(A) and 9-102(B) of the attorney’s ethics rules in effect at the time of the offenses. In the case of Kerry Johnson Mr. Milligan used Mr. Johnson’s monies for his personal use.  He signed the names of the Johnsons to a release and falsely notarized the signatures.  The Court found that this conduct involved dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. The Court found that Mr. Milligan thereby violated DR1-102(A) of the Attorney’s Ethics Rules in effect at the time of the offenses.  The Court stated in its opinion “We find these violations to be very serious and indicative of conduct that should not and will not be tolerated.” The Court found as aggravating circumstances Milligan’s prior public censure and two admonitions, as well as his failure to comply with the recommendations of Suzanne Rose, the Tennessee Bar Law Practice Management Consultant.  It found as a mitigating factor the fact that Mr. Milligan “Ultimately made good the checks returned for insufficient funds and there is no evidence that any individual lost money as a result of (Milligan’s) actions.” (June 28, 2005)

James, David D., Jr., formerly of Memphis and currently residing in Olive Branch, MS, was suspended from the practice of law for one year effective July 10, 2005, by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  James had previously been temporarily suspended from the practice of law on June 16, 2004 for failure to respond to a complaint of misconduct, and on June 23, 2003, the Board placed his law license on inactive status due to his own request. A petition for discipline was filed by the Board against James on November 2, 2004 alleging that he acknowledged receipt of $250 in attorney fees from a client in September, 2002 for him to add a creditor to her prior Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.  The petition also alleged that James did not file the requested Motion to Reopen the client’s bankruptcy matter, but kept the $250 paid to him.  James failed to respond to the petition, and accordingly, a motion for default judgment was filed and granted against him on March 30, 2005. A hearing on the petition for discipline as to disciplinary sanction was conducted before a Hearing Panel of the Board on March 30, 2005.  James did not appear at the hearing.  The Hearing Panel in its April 11, 2005 Judgment found that James violated the Code of Professional Responsibility, and the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct due to his failure to perform or to communicate with his client, his neglect of her matter, and his apparent misappropriation of the client’s fees.  The Panel also found that his evading properly addressed certified mail and his failure to cooperate, answer or defend, his indifference to making restitution to the client, and his substantial experience in the practice of law were aggravating circumstances in this case. (June 30, 2005)

Crawford, Scott Eric, a Memphis attorney, was immediately suspended from the practice of law pursuant to Section 14 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9, pending further orders of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Crawford’s suspension resulted from his plea of guilty in the United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee at Memphis on March 13, 2005 to several charges constituting serious crimes. Crawford pleaded guilty to seven counts of laundering drug money through his law practice, and to an array of bribery, possessing an illegal handgun, and obstruction of justice charges.  The Court further ordered that a formal disciplinary proceeding be instituted in which the sole issue to be determined will be the extent of final discipline.  Crawford will remain suspended pending resolution of that formal proceeding. Crawford has been subject to a prior Supreme Court order temporarily suspending his law license filed on March 19, 2004, because his continued practice after being indicted on some of the federal charges posed a risk of irreparable harm to the general public, pursuant to Section 4.3 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9.  According to the March 19, 2004 temporary suspension order, Crawford was not entitled to petition the Supreme Court for dissolution or modification of said order unless he was acquitted of the federal charges or unless they were dismissed by the US District Court. (July 5, 2005)

Hodges, Warner, III, a Memphis attorney, was suspended from practicing law for one year, retroactive to October 1, 2004, by the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  The Supreme Court further ordered that Hodges shall continue in his monitoring agreement with Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program (TLAP) upon terms and conditions recommended by TLAP, for a period of five (5) years, with any reported incidence of non-compliance constituting immediate grounds for summary suspension. Disciplinary Counsel filed a Petition for Discipline pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  Pursuant to Section 16.1 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9, Hodges submitted a Conditional Guilty Plea admitting he had been out of compliance with his contract with Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program (TLAP) and that he had practiced law after having been suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court.  The Board of Professional Responsibility approved the plea and the Tennessee Supreme Court accepted its recommendation. The Supreme Court also ordered that Hodges comply with Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 which requires Hodges to notify by registered or certified mail all clients being represented in pending matters, all co-counsel and opposing counsel of the Supreme Court’s Order suspending his license.  Section 18 also requires Hodges to deliver to all clients any papers or property to which they are entitled. (July 11, 2005)

Barnett, Stanley R., a Knoxville attorney, was suspended from the practice of law in this state for a period of three years retroactive to April 1, 2002.A Petition for Discipline had been filed against Mr. Barnett by the Board of Professional Responsibility on May 12, 2003.  On June 14, 2005, Mr. Barnett entered into a Conditional Plea of Guilty with the Board of Professional Responsibility to resolve the Petition for Discipline in exchange for the three-year suspension.  Mr. Barnett failed to comply with the court-ordered conditions on his earlier reinstatement, failed to refund an unearned portion of a fee to a client upon being terminated, failed to appear at scheduled court dates in cases where he was counsel of record, neglected cases and failed to communicate with his clients, failed to return one client's file upon request after being terminated, failed to respond to requests for information from the Office of Disciplinary Counsel, and failed notify his clients of his interim suspension as required by the Supreme Court Rules. (July 12, 2005)

Kennedy, James L., a Knoxville attorney, was suspended from the practice of law in Tennessee for 90 days. Mr. Kennedy failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client with regard to an estate and failed to keep the client reasonably informed regarding that matter.  Mr. Kennedy had been administratively suspended from the practice of law by Order of the Supreme Court entered February 16, 2000, for non-compliance with Continuing Legal Education requirements, but continued to practice law while on suspended status.  Mr. Kennedy admitted violating DR 1-102(A)(1)(5)(6), DR 3-101(B), DR 6-101(A)(2)(3), and DR 7-101(A) of the Code of Professional Responsibility and Rules of Professional Conduct 1.3, 5.5, and 8.4(d). (July 12, 2005)

Rainwater, John Earl, a Knoxville attorney, has been reinstated to the practice of law by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Mr. Rainwater was temporarily suspended from the practice of law by Order of the Supreme Court on April 22, 2005, for failing to respond to a complaint of misconduct.  On May 23, 2005, Mr. Rainwater filed a Petition to Dissolve Temporary Suspension and a response to the complaint.  A hearing was conducted on June 17, 2005.  On June 27, 2005, the Hearing Panel recommended that the temporary suspension be dissolved.  In the July 20, 2005, Order, the Supreme Court required Mr. Rainwater to pay to the Board of Professional Responsibility and to the Appellate Court Clerk the costs and expenses of this proceeding. ( July 20, 2005)

 

 2005 Alphabetical

Arnold, Rebecca C., a Memphis lawyer, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law by order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  The Court suspended Arnold based upon a petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that she failed to substantially comply with a contract she entered into with the Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program. (Feb. 3, 2005)

Ballentine, Emilia Green, of Memphis, was suspended from the practice of law for one year by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court, effective March 6, 2005.  Ballentine had previously been temporarily suspended from the practice of law on July 3, 2003 for failure to respond to a complaint of misconduct, and administratively suspended from the practice due to her failure to comply with the rule on mandatory continuing legal education on January 29, 2002. A petition for discipline was filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility against Ballentine on November 3, 2003 alleging that she continued to practice law at the Suskind, Susser firm through March of 2003 even though her law license had been in a continuous state of suspension since January 29, 2002 for failure to obtain mandatory minimum CLE.  When Ballentine failed to respond to the petition, a motion for default judgment was filed and granted against her on September 8, 2004.  (February 23, 2005)

Barnett, Stanley R., a Knoxville attorney, was suspended from the practice of law in this state for a period of three years retroactive to April 1, 2002.A Petition for Discipline had been filed against Mr. Barnett by the Board of Professional Responsibility on May 12, 2003.  On June 14, 2005, Mr. Barnett entered into a Conditional Plea of Guilty with the Board of Professional Responsibility to resolve the Petition for Discipline in exchange for the three-year suspension.  Mr. Barnett failed to comply with the court-ordered conditions on his earlier reinstatement, failed to refund an unearned portion of a fee to a client upon being terminated, failed to appear at scheduled court dates in cases where he was counsel of record, neglected cases and failed to communicate with his clients, failed to return one client's file upon request after being terminated, failed to respond to requests for information from the Office of Disciplinary Counsel, and failed notify his clients of his interim suspension as required by the Supreme Court Rules. (July 12, 2005)

Barnwell, Howard Brownlow, a Chattanooga attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility after voluntarily dismissing a case for which he was representing a client.  Mr. Barnwell failed to re-file the case within the one year permitted by the savings statute.  Mr. Barnwell's conduct violated DR 1-102(A)(1)(6), DR 6-101(A)(2), and DR 7-101(A)(1)(3) of the Code of Professional Responsibility. (May 16, 2005)

Boyd, Arch B III, of Memphis, was on the receiving end of a public censure from the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility. He did not request a hearing.  Respondent neglected his legal matter, failed to adequately communicate with his client and failed to refund any monies after being terminated.  The Board issued the public censure on the condition that Boyd submit the fee matter to the Memphis Bar Association Fee Dispute Committee to determine whether a refund is due and if so, in what amount.  The Board determined that Boyd’s conduct was in violation of DR 1-102(A)(1)(5)(6); DR 6-101(A)(3) and DR 7-101(A)(1)(2)(3)(4) of the Code of Professional Responsibility.  A public censure is a form of discipline that declares the conduct of the lawyer improper but does not limit the lawyer’s right to practice law. (April 14, 2005)

Brown, Gloria Jean, a Knoxville lawyer, had her law license suspended by the Supreme Court of Tennessee for one year. The suspension is based on two petitions for discipline filed by Disciplinary Counsel pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court. Ms. Brown did not file an answer to either petition and a default judgment was granted. Ms. Brown was retained to represent Rita Ellis in a criminal matter.  She neglected her case and failed to adequately communicate with her.  She was cited in contempt by the Anderson County Chancery Court for her failure to appear at a hearing in said court.  She also failed to appear on behalf of her client, Patricia Lynn Smith, in Loudon County General Sessions Court.  In several cases, the courts and opposing counsel were unable to contact Ms. Brown.  Letters were returned or unanswered.  Similarly she did return her phone calls. Ms. Brown was also guilty of other allegations which were not charges of neglect.  She filed a frivolous action against employees of the Domestic Violence Crisis Center in Lenoir City.   Ms. Brown further acted in a bizarre manner by cursing and/or screaming at opposing counsel and staff of the Disciplinary Counsel.  Her license was suspended for her failure to obtain sufficient continuing legal education hours, but she continued to practice law. (Jan. 26, 2005)

Bush, Charles E., of Clarksville, was transferred to disability inactive status. Mr. Bush's disability arises out of a medical condition which incapacitates him from continuing the practice of law. (Feb. 9, 2005)

Cain, Leroy, Jr., of Nashville, has been suspended from the practice of law for nine months by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. The Court also ordered Cain to make restitution of $150 to one client and restitution in the amount of $415 to a second client within thirty (30) days of the Supreme Court’s Order. The Supreme Court suspended Cain for Cain’s continued practice of law while on suspension.  Cain was suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court on December 17, 2002 for non-compliance with his continuing legal education requirements, however, Cain continued practicing law after being suspended.  Cain failed to withdraw after being suspended; made misrepresentations to and failed to adequately communicate with clients, courts, opposing counsel and the Board of Professional Responsibility; accepted fees while suspended; disclosed client confidences and neglected client matters. On July 7, 2005 until April 7, 2006, Cain shall not use any indicia of lawyer, legal assistant or law clerk nor maintain a presence where the practice of law is conducted.  Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 requires Cain to notify all clients that are being represented in pending matters; all counsel and opposing counsel of the Supreme Court’s Order suspending him.  Section 18 of Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court, also requires Cain to deliver to all clients any papers or property to which they are entitled. (June 27, 2005)

Church, Christine Zellar, of Clarksville, Tennessee, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Church was given notice of this censure and did not request a hearing.  The Board censured Church for making unclear statements and failing to clarify facts to the Complainant’s current employer regarding whether the Complainant had been fired  by her two previous employers.  Church’s actions violate Rule 8.4(c) of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct and for these violations the Board censures Church.  The censure declares Church’s actions to be improper but does not limit her right to practice law. (March 7, 2005)

Cohn, William A., a Cordova attorney, was suspended by the Supreme Court for 90 days. (Jan. 10, 2005)

Crawford, Scott Eric, a Memphis attorney, was immediately suspended from the practice of law pursuant to Section 14 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9, pending further orders of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Crawford’s suspension resulted from his plea of guilty in the United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee at Memphis on March 13, 2005 to several charges constituting serious crimes. Crawford pleaded guilty to seven counts of laundering drug money through his law practice, and to an array of bribery, possessing an illegal handgun, and obstruction of justice charges.  The Court further ordered that a formal disciplinary proceeding be instituted in which the sole issue to be determined will be the extent of final discipline.  Crawford will remain suspended pending resolution of that formal proceeding. Crawford has been subject to a prior Supreme Court order temporarily suspending his law license filed on March 19, 2004, because his continued practice after being indicted on some of the federal charges posed a risk of irreparable harm to the general public, pursuant to Section 4.3 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9.  According to the March 19, 2004 temporary suspension order, Crawford was not entitled to petition the Supreme Court for dissolution or modification of said order unless he was acquitted of the federal charges or unless they were dismissed by the US District Court. (July 5, 2005)

Crowe, Denvil F, Jr.,  a Nashville lawyer, was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility , for failure to contact his Chapter 13 Bankruptcy clients directly to inform them how to contact him after closing his Nashville office and relocating to Tupelo, Mississippi.  Crowe violated Rules 1.1; 1.2; 1.3; 1.4; 1.5 and 8.4 of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct.  The imposition of this censure declares Crowe’s actions to be improper ethical conduct, but does not limit his right to practice law. (May 19, 2005)

Dolan, John Louis, a Memphis attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in Tennessee by Order of the Supreme Court.   The Court suspended Dolan based upon a Petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that he failed to respond to Disciplinary Counsel or to the Board concerning a complaint of misconduct. This suspension was issued pursuant to Section 4.3 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9.  Dolan is precluded from accepting any new clients after May 26, 2005, and is also precluded from representing present clients after June 25, 2005.  After June 25, 2005, Dolan shall furthermore not use any indicia of lawyer, legal assistant or law clerk, nor maintain a presence where the practice of law is conducted. Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 requires Dolan to notify by registered or certified mail all clients being represented in pending matters; all co-counsel and opposing counsel of the Supreme Court’s Order suspending him.  Section 18 also requires Dolan to deliver to all clients any papers or property to which they are entitled. This suspension shall remain in effect until it is dissolved or amended by Order of the Supreme Court. (May 26, 2005)

Fisher, James B, Jr., of Memphis, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility on .  The censure was issued by the Board pursuant to Rule 9, Section 8 of the Rules of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Fisher did not request a hearing on the matter. A complaint alleging ethical misconduct was filed against Fisher and the Board’s investigation revealed that he had consistently used his IOLTA escrow account for a very large number of personal transactions unrelated to his law practice from January, 1998 through July of 2004. Fisher ceased this activity in August of 2004. The Board found no actual misappropriation of entrusted funds on Fisher’s part, and found somewhat mitigating his acceptance of responsibility and his acknowledgment that such commingling was ethically improper.  Fisher’s substantial experience in the practice of law (licensed to practice in 1978) was considered an aggravating circumstance in this matter. (May 25, 2005)

Fitzgerald, Michael D.,  a Memphis lawyer,  was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. Fitzgerald failed to keep trust account records as required by Section 29 of Supreme Court Rule 9 and Rule 1.15 of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct making it impossible to determine if Fitzgerald was handling trust funds correctly. (April 13, 2005)

Gilmer, Michael E., a Columbia lawyer, was suspended by the Supreme Court (Jan. 13, 2005)

Hodges, Warner, III, a Memphis attorney, was suspended from practicing law for one year, retroactive to October 1, 2004, by the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  The Supreme Court further ordered that Hodges shall continue in his monitoring agreement with Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program (TLAP) upon terms and conditions recommended by TLAP, for a period of five (5) years, with any reported incidence of non-compliance constituting immediate grounds for summary suspension. Disciplinary Counsel filed a Petition for Discipline pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  Pursuant to Section 16.1 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9, Hodges submitted a Conditional Guilty Plea admitting he had been out of compliance with his contract with Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program (TLAP) and that he had practiced law after having been suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court.  The Board of Professional Responsibility approved the plea and the Tennessee Supreme Court accepted its recommendation. The Supreme Court also ordered that Hodges comply with Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 which requires Hodges to notify by registered or certified mail all clients being represented in pending matters, all co-counsel and opposing counsel of the Supreme Court’s Order suspending his license.  Section 18 also requires Hodges to deliver to all clients any papers or property to which they are entitled. (July 11, 2005)

Hornick, Joseph L., of Dickson, had a run in with the Supreme Court of Tennessee, and Hornick lost. The Court entered an Order suspending the law license of Joseph L. Hornick for a period of forty-five (45) days beginning July 1, 2005. The Board of Professional Responsibility filed a Petition for Discipline against Hornick pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  The Board’s Petition charged Hornick with neglect and failure to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in filing a client’s divorce and then paying the client’s court cost.  The Petition also charged Hornick with misinforming his client regarding payment of the court cost.  The Board of Professional Responsibility filed a Supplemental Petition for Discipline against Hornick which alleged that Hornick had made false and misleading statements to the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Hornick submitted a Conditional Guilty Plea in exchange for a stated form of discipline.  The discipline Hornick agreed to, which was approved by a Hearing Panel, the Board and the Court, was that Hornick would be suspended for forty-five (45) days; and have a practice monitor for a period of one (1) year who shall provide monthly reports to the Board.  (May 12, 2005)

James, David D., Jr., formerly of Memphis and currently residing in Olive Branch, MS, was suspended from the practice of law for one year effective July 10, 2005, by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  James had previously been temporarily suspended from the practice of law on June 16, 2004 for failure to respond to a complaint of misconduct, and on June 23, 2003, the Board placed his law license on inactive status due to his own request. A petition for discipline was filed by the Board against James on November 2, 2004 alleging that he acknowledged receipt of $250 in attorney fees from a client in September, 2002 for him to add a creditor to her prior Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.  The petition also alleged that James did not file the requested Motion to Reopen the client’s bankruptcy matter, but kept the $250 paid to him.  James failed to respond to the petition, and accordingly, a motion for default judgment was filed and granted against him on March 30, 2005. A hearing on the petition for discipline as to disciplinary sanction was conducted before a Hearing Panel of the Board on March 30, 2005.  James did not appear at the hearing.  The Hearing Panel in its April 11, 2005 Judgment found that James violated the Code of Professional Responsibility, and the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct due to his failure to perform or to communicate with his client, his neglect of her matter, and his apparent misappropriation of the client’s fees.  The Panel also found that his evading properly addressed certified mail and his failure to cooperate, answer or defend, his indifference to making restitution to the client, and his substantial experience in the practice of law were aggravating circumstances in this case. (June 30, 2005)

Jessup, William Eugene, formerly a Chattanooga attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility, for charging a client an excessive fee.  Mr. Jessup was engaged in 1996 to enroll a foreign judgment and sue his client's ex-husband for contempt.  The case was highly contested.  Mr. Jessup was successful in obtaining judgment on behalf of his client.  Mr. Jessup charged a fee of in excess of $41,000.00 for time and expenses expended on the case, of which Mr. Jessup had been paid $17,418.00.  On May 18, 1998, Mr. Jessup filed suit against the client for the balance of his fees.  The client filed a counter-claim against Mr. Jessup claiming that Mr. Jessup had charged a clearly excessive fee for that type of case.  The case was tried before a jury on September 25, 2001, and the jury found that Mr. Jessup attempted to collect a clearly excessive fee. (March 4, 2005)

Kennedy, James L., a Knoxville attorney, was suspended from the practice of law in Tennessee for 90 days. Mr. Kennedy failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client with regard to an estate and failed to keep the client reasonably informed regarding that matter.  Mr. Kennedy had been administratively suspended from the practice of law by Order of the Supreme Court entered February 16, 2000, for non-compliance with Continuing Legal Education requirements, but continued to practice law while on suspended status.  Mr. Kennedy admitted violating DR 1-102(A)(1)(5)(6), DR 3-101(B), DR 6-101(A)(2)(3), and DR 7-101(A) of the Code of Professional Responsibility and Rules of Professional Conduct 1.3, 5.5, and 8.4(d). (July 12, 2005

LaGuardia, Michael J., of Kingsport, received a public censure from the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility. Mr. LaGuardia self-reported to the Board. Mr. LaGuardia testified in a pre-trial deposition in his divorce case, wherein he stated that he purchased a Dodge Intrepid in June 2002.  He stated that he later sold it to “a neighbor and friend . . . Susan Carter.”  (Susan Carter became Mr. LaGuardia’s girlfriend a few months after the divorce began.)  Ms. Carter paid him nothing, but simply took over the payments on Mr. LaGuardia’s loan.  Mr. LaGuardia stated in the deposition that he entered into a financing arrangement to obtain the car for the $13,000 purchase price.  He stated that the dealer financed it “a hundred percent . . . I never had to put a dime on it.”  At the trial, Mr. LaGuardia stated that the dealer did not finance 100 percent of the purchase price but that Mr. LaGuardia had put down $5,700 and therefore had an interest in the car for this amount.  He further admitted that he did not tell the truth in the deposition. Mr. LaGuardia has thereby violated Rules of Professional Conduct Nos. 3.3, 4.4, and 8.4.  He did not request a hearing.  This censure does not affect Mr. LaGuardia’s ability to continue to practice law. (March 18, 2005) 

Mask, John Carlin Jr., a lawyer from Hardeman County, has been disbarred by the Tennessee Supreme Court for misappropriation of client funds, posing a threat of "irreparable harm" to the public, misconduct, incompetence, failing to zealously represent clients, failure to represent within the bounds of law and engaging in the unauthorized practice of law. The hearing panel also found that aggravating circumstances existed because of the length of time Mr. Mask had practiced law (26) years); his prior history of unethical conduct, his dishonesty and his failure to make restitution.  Furthermore, the Hearing Panel found there were no mitigating circumstances.  Neither Mr. Mask nor the Board appealed the Hearing Panel’s Findings. (Feb. 1, 2005)

Milligan, James L., Jr., a Knoxville lawyer, has been suspended from the practice of law for two years by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Disciplinary Counsel of the Board of Professional Responsibility had filed a petition for discipline as to Mr. Milligan.  The petition was heard before a hearing panel of the Board, which recommended disbarment. Mr. Milligan appealed. The Knoxville Chancery Court (William Inman, Sr. serving as special judge) recommended Mr. Milligan receive a Public Censure.  Disciplinary Counsel appealed to the Supreme Court, with the Court deciding to suspend Mr. Milligan’s law license for two (2) years. The Court found that Mr. Milligan misappropriated trust funds.  He overdrew on his trust account 24 times in one year.  In an eight month period he incurred overdraft charges in the amount of $766.  He wrote a check on his trust account to Attorney G. Turner Howard, for Mr. Howard’s work on a case that had been settled which was returned for insufficient funds.  In the case of Michael Overton, Mr. Milligan deposited in his checking account $50,000 on May 7, 1999.  Mr. Milligan did not make a disbursement to Mr. Overton in the amount of $29,924.21 until May 28, 2002.  During this period of time, Mr. Milligan’s trust account dipped beneath $29,924.21 indicating a misappropriation of funds.  Mr. Milligan admitted using client funds before settlement funds were deposited in his trust account and depositing client funds in non-trust accounts.  The Court found that Mr. Milligan thereby violated DR1-102(A), 2-106(A), 7-101(A), 9-102(A) and 9-102(B) of the attorney’s ethics rules in effect at the time of the offenses. In the case of Kerry Johnson Mr. Milligan used Mr. Johnson’s monies for his personal use.  He signed the names of the Johnsons to a release and falsely notarized the signatures.  The Court found that this conduct involved dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. The Court found that Mr. Milligan thereby violated DR1-102(A) of the Attorney’s Ethics Rules in effect at the time of the offenses.  The Court stated in its opinion “We find these violations to be very serious and indicative of conduct that should not and will not be tolerated.” The Court found as aggravating circumstances Milligan’s prior public censure and two admonitions, as well as his failure to comply with the recommendations of Suzanne Rose, the Tennessee Bar Law Practice Management Consultant.  It found as a mitigating factor the fact that Mr. Milligan “Ultimately made good the checks returned for insufficient funds and there is no evidence that any individual lost money as a result of (Milligan’s) actions.” (June 28, 2005)

Nanney, Douglas P., a Hickman County attorney, was suspended from the practice of law in by the Tennessee Supreme Court for a period of two years, to be followed by a period of indefinite suspension. Nanney’s suspension resulted from Nanney pleading guilty to a violation of 40-35-313, Tennessee Code Annotated, a Class E Felony, possession of drug paraphernalia. (Feb. 3, 2005)

Officer, Albert F, III, of Cookeville, was reinstated to the practice of law by order of the Tennessee Supreme Court. Mr. Officer had been suspended by the Supreme Court on June 5, 2001, for three and one-half years retroactive to April 7, 1999, the date on which he had previously been temporarily suspended by the Supreme Court. Mr. Officer's license to practice law be reinstated on the stated conditions.  Mr. Officer has entered into a contract with Cookeville lawyer Martelia T. Crawford to serve as Practice Monitor for Mr. Officer. (February 18, 2005)

Rainwater, John Earl, of Knoxville, was temporarily suspended from the practice of law by order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee for failing to respond to a complaint of misconduct. Mr. Rainwater may for good cause request dissolution or modification of this temporary suspension by petition to the Supreme Court.  This temporary suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the Supreme Court. (April 22, 2005.)

Rainwater, John Earl, a Knoxville attorney, has been reinstated to the practice of law by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Mr. Rainwater was temporarily suspended from the practice of law by Order of the Supreme Court on April 22, 2005, for failing to respond to a complaint of misconduct.  On May 23, 2005, Mr. Rainwater filed a Petition to Dissolve Temporary Suspension and a response to the complaint.  A hearing was conducted on June 17, 2005.  On June 27, 2005, the Hearing Panel recommended that the temporary suspension be dissolved.  In the July 20, 2005, Order, the Supreme Court required Mr. Rainwater to pay to the Board of Professional Responsibility and to the Appellate Court Clerk the costs and expenses of this proceeding. ( July 20, 2005)

Rather, James L., a Knoxville lawyer, was censured by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility for assisting in the unauthorized practice of law. (Jan. 31, 2005)

Richter, Timothy Joseph, a Springfield lawyer, has been reinstated by the Tennessee Supreme Court after taking disability inactive status in 2003 (Jan. 24, 2005)

Schwarz, Earle J., a Memphis lawyer, was issued a public censure by the Board of Professional Responsibility.  He did not request a hearing.  A complaint was filed against Schwarz based on a declaration filed by him in a habeas corpus action that Schwarz willfully neglected his representation of his client.  Schwarz neglected his client’s legal matter in a death penalty case and filed a declaration and subsequent habeas corpus proceeding. (April 25, 2005)

Shaw, Clark L., of Nashville, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility for failing to take prompt action on behalf of a client’s request for a restraining order.  In addition, Shaw failed to promptly address a problem with an order that had been entered that was contrary to the Court’s original order.  The respondent did file a motion to amend this order which was eventually granted by the Court some months later.  The client also complained that Shaw failed to respond to his request for information.   Mr. Shaw also failed to provide the client with the requested itemized statement regarding Shaw’s bill. (February 11, 2005)

Slavin, Edward A., Jr., a suspended St. Augustine, Fla. attorney, was found in willful contempt of court by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. He was sentenced to ten (10) days in jail and fined $50.00. Slavin’s law license was suspended on August 27, 2004 for a period of two (2) years.  The suspension order specifically mandated that Slavin comply in all respects with Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 and specifically with Section 18 regarding the obligations and responsibilities of suspended attorneys. Disciplinary Counsel filed a Petition for Contempt charging Slavin with contemptuous conduct as follows:

            1.         That Slavin had failed to comply with the Supreme Court’s Order of suspension;

            2.         That Slavin had entered his appearance representing clients after having been suspended by Order of this Court on August 27, 2004; and

            3.         That Slavin has failed to comply with Section 18 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 as ordered August 27, 2004, by failing to notify opposing counsel and clients of his suspension and by failing to file an affidavit to that affect.

The Court found that Slavin’s failure or refusal to comply with the Order to file the affidavit required by Section 18.8 of Supreme Court Rule 9 was willful and constituted willful contempt of the Court beyond a reasonable doubt. (June 17, 2005)

Stinnett, Jeffrey Andrew, a Chattanooga attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Mr. Stinnett engaged in the practice of law during a period after his license to practice law was administratively suspended on September 24, 2003, for failing to comply with continuing legal education requirements. (April 19, 2005)

 Temple, Steven Monroe, of Memphis, was suspended from the practice of law by the Supreme Court of Tennessee for one year retroactive to October 28, 2003, the date upon which he was first suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Temple abandoned his law practice without notice to his clients, charged excessive fees, failed to withdraw from his clients’ cases when he could no longer represent the clients, failed to adequately communicate with his clients and failed to return unused portions of retainer fees.  As a result of his failure to respond, Temple’s law license has been temporarily suspended since October 28, 2003. Disciplinary Counsel filed a petition for discipline and a supplemental petition for discipline pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  Temple agreed to enter into a conditional guilty plea to the petitions in exchange for a one year suspension retroactive to October 28, 2003 the date upon which he was first suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court and Temple agreed to make restitution. (February 3, 2005)

Thomas, Susanna Laws, a Newport lawyer, had her law license suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court of Tennessee Laws failed to respond to the Board of Professional Responsibility concerning two complaints of misconduct. Because Ms. Thomas was suspended on September 7, 2004, for failure to comply with her Continuing Legal Education requirements and on September 20, 2004, for failing to pay her annual registration fee to the Board of Professional Responsibility, she should already have met these requirements and should not have any existing clients or pending matters. (Feb. 4, 2005)

Whiteside, Thomas L., of Brentwood, was disbarred by order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Previously on January 28, 2004, the Supreme Court temporarily suspended Mr. Whiteside’s right to practice for failure to respond to a disciplinary complaint. A petition for discipline involving three disciplinary complaints was filed on June 28, 2004.  On August 12, 2004, a motion for default judgment on the petition for discipline was filed. The hearing panel found that the respondent abandoned his law practice, knowingly failed to perform services to clients and neglected legal matters of clients causing serious injury to his clients.  The hearing panel found that Whiteside took client funds under false pretenses and deceived his clients. (March 4, 2005)

Woodby, David E., a Bristol lawyer, was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. On February 16, 2000, Mr. Woodby’s law license was suspended for noncompliance with CLE.  It was reinstated on January 10, 2001.  On September 24, 2003, it was suspended again for noncompliance with CLE. Since September 24, 2003, Mr. Woodby continued to practice law.  He had some bankruptcy cases before Bankruptcy Judge Martha Parsons.  She discovered that he had never been admitted to practice before the Eastern District of Tennessee Federal Court and instructed him to apply.  He indicated to her that he would.  Mr. Woodby continued to file bankruptcy cases, but did not apply for admission.  Judge Parsons issued a show cause order in four of his bankruptcy cases.  At the Show Cause hearing on February 24, 2003, Mr. Woodby indicated to Judge Parsons that he was in the process of obtaining a certificate of good standing from the State of Tennessee and requested additional time to complete the admission practice. On or about March 10, 2003, Chapter 13 Trustee, Gwendolyn M. Kerney, received a notice of levy on Mr. Woodby in the amount of $64, 270.95 compelling her to remit all fees due him as debtor’s attorney to the IRS.  Ms. Kerney checked with the Board and discovered that Mr. Woodby’s license had been suspended since the previous September. (March 9, 2005)

 

2004 Chronological

Perkins, Samuel L., a Memphis lawyer, was censured by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility. In one complaint filed against Perkins, the Board found that he failed to render effective assistance of counsel to a former client in a homicide prosecution, by failing to discover a material witness, by not calling such witness to testify at trial and by losing all record of the witness.  In late 1998, the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals upheld the client’s post-conviction petition and remanded the matter to the Shelby County Criminal Court. The Board placed this disciplinary investigation in abeyance while further proceedings in the client’s matter were before the trial and appellate courts after the 1998 remand. In early 2003, the Board reactivated its investigation after learning that respondent’s former client was convicted of second degree murder at retrial, and that the client received a 15 year sentence. In November 2004, Disciplinary Counsel and respondent entered into a conditional settlement agreement whereby respondent would be publicly censured for his neglect, and whereby respondent would be required to cooperate with his practice assistance monitor and ensure said monitor provides quarterly progress reports to the Board for one year after the filing date of any Public Censure imposed.  Respondent’s practice assistance monitor has agreed to review his caseload periodically, and to review with respondent and provide further instructions on ensuring respondent’s compliance with the Criminal Defense Standards applicable to investigation and preparation. On December 10, 2004, the Board approved the conditional settlement agreement negotiated between Disciplinary Counsel and respondent. (Dec. 10, 2004)

Galbraith, Charles Ford, was placed on disability inactive status as a result of a medical condition. (Dec. 7, 2004)

Strohm, Carroll Thomas, of Nashville, was disbarred by the Tennessee Supreme Court (Nov. 30, 2004)

Maddux, H. Owen, a Chattanooga attorney, was suspended from the practice of law for thirty days, placed on probation for one year, and otherwise sanctioned by Opinion and Judgment of the Supreme Court of Tennessee entered August 27, 2004.  A Petition for Rehearing filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility was denied by the Supreme Court on November 9, 2004.  Pursuant to Section 18.5 of Supreme Court Rule 9, the suspension became effective ten days from the date of the denial of the Petition for Rehearing. In December, 1994, Mr. Maddux began taking and converting to his own use partnership fees, income, and/or client payments made by at least seventeen separate partnership clients on approximately fifty different occasions over a three-year period from December, 1994, through November, 1997, in the total sum exceeding $92,000.00.  Mr. Maddux took the partnership fees, income, and/or client payments without the knowledge or consent of the other partners.  On October 16, 1996, the firm filed suit against Mr. Maddux in the Chancery Court for Hamilton County to recover the firm monies.  By Judgment filed in the Chancery Court for Hamilton County, Tennessee, on October 2, 2000, Mr. Maddux was found to have defrauded the partnership and wrongfully converted $92,534.57 in receivables from the partnership.  The Board of Professional Responsibility then filed the Petition for Discipline. Mr. Maddux may resume the practice of law upon the expiration of the period of suspension. (Nov. 24, 2004)

Brooks, Troy Lee, a Mt. Juliet lawyer, was suspended Nov. 115, 2004, from the practice of law for misappropriating funds to his own use and posing "a threat of irreparable harm to the public." (Nov. 15, 2004)

Arnold, Rebecca C., of Memphis, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility after finding she neglected a client’s Chapter 13 bankruptcy matter, failed to move with reasonable diligence and promptness, failed to properly communicate with her client, and deceived this client by falsely informing the client that she had filed a motion requested by the client.  Moreover, Arnold was very dilatory in responding to Disciplinary Counsel’s inquiries.  The Board noted her demonstrated pattern of dilatoriness, and her history of prior disciplinary sanctions in the areas of neglect and failure to properly communicate with clients. As part of the censure, the Board required Arnold to enter into a TLAP contract for peer assistance to address her chronic depression for a duration to be determined by TLAP, and to ensure that TLAP provides the Board with quarterly progress reports during the period of TLAP monitoring. (Aug. 27, 2004)

Allen, Sean Kendrick, of Nashville, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Allen was given notice of the censure and did not request a hearing. Allen was placed on administrative suspension on September 24, 2003 for Continuing Legal Education non-compliance.  Allen continued to practice law in violation of this administrative suspension.  Allen’s actions violate Rules 1.3; 3.2; 3.4, and 8.4 of the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct and for these actions the Board publicly censures Allen. (August 20, 2004) 

 Terry, Paul Allan II, of Livingston, was suspended from the practice of law by the Tennessee Supreme Court. (Aug. 13, 2004)

Cartwright, Richard D.,  a lawyer from Covington, Tennessee, received a Public Censure from the Board of  Professional Responsibility. On April 22, 2004, the Court of Criminal Appeals entered an order finding that Cartwright  “flagrantly disregarded the three previous orders of the Court.”  The Court  further found that although Cartwright’s actions could have resulted in three separate contempts of court, the Court combined the contempts into one and found Cartwright in criminal contempt of court.  The Court further ordered Cartwright sentenced to 10 days in the Madison County Jail and fined $50, provided that nine days of the jail time was suspended provided that attorney Cartwright conform to the rules of appellate practice and further rules of  this court in the conclusion and the handling of the underlying case.  The Court ordered Mr. Cartwright to serve one day in the Madison County Jail from the period of 9:00 A.M. in the morning until 4:00 P.M. in the afternoon. (On July 20, 2004)

Cornell, Helen Loftin, Nashville, was publicly censured by the Tennessee Supreme Court after She acknowledged that she transferred her mother’s home to herself by a power of attorney without the knowledge of her mother, which act required litigation for her mother to regain legal title to her home. (July 12, 2004) More on this lawyer

Johnson, Curtis D., a Memphis attorney,  was publicly censured by the Tennessee Supreme Court .  Pursuant to Section 16 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9,  Johnson submitted a guilty plea in exchange for a stated form of discipline.  He acknowledged that he had been negligent in the handling of certain client matters, that he had charged an excessive fee and that he had failed to adequately communicate with his clients. Pursuant to the guilty plea Johnson agreed to and has written an apology to Judge Polster; Johnson shall make and has made restitution to complainant Savannah Robertson; and Johnson shall have a practice monitor for a period of six months from the date of the final order in this cause who shall file written monthly reports to Disciplinary Counsel regarding Johnson’s progress  in establishing adequate communication procedures with his clients. (July 27, 2004)

Walwyn, Paul J., a Madison lawyer, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. The censure was based on two legal matters.  In one complaint, Walwyn represented a client in a child support and child custody matter.  Walwyn neglected the matter and failed to prepare the matter.  Walwyn failed to prepare a court order as directed by the court for eight months. The other matter was the appeal of a criminal conviction.  Mr. Walwyn filed a notice of appeal five days late and he filed his brief over sixty days late.  After the conviction was affirmed, Walwyn failed to file a timely petition to the Supreme Court resulting in a loss of further review. (July 22, 2004.)

King, Mary Forrester, of Memphis, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. (June 30, 2004.)

Barnwell, Howard Brownlow, a Chattanooga attorney, was temporarily suspended, pursuant to Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, upon a finding that Mr. Barnwell had failed to respond to the Board of Professional Responsibility concerning a complaint of misconduct. (June 11, 2004)

Nacaranto, Tom Anthony, a Lexington attorney, has been suspended for three years by the Tennessee Supreme Court (June 10, 2004)

Wasson, Gordon M., and Arizona attorney, was reciprocally suspended from the practice of law in Tennessee. (June 10, 2004)

Bailey,Javier Michael, a Memphis attorney, entered into an Agreed Order and Conditional Guilty Plea which was entered by the Tennessee Supreme Court on May 27, 2004, effective January 2, 2004.    The Agreed Order placed Javier Michael Bailey on probation for a period of four (4) years and eleven (11) months after serving an actual suspension of thirty (30) days, which Bailey served beginning January 2, 2004 through February 2, 2004, during all of which Bailey shall continue to be monitored by the Tennessee Lawyers’ Assistance Program (TLAP) as set forth in the TLAP Monitoring Advocacy Agreement. (May 27, 2004)

Renard, Christopher P., a Memphis attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in this state by Order of the Supreme Court. The Court suspended Renard based upon a petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that he failed to respond to Disciplinary Counsel or to the Board concerning two complaints of misconduct. (May 21, 2004)

Ramos, Fernando J.,  a Nashville lawyer, a Nashville lawyer, was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility on May 5, 2004 based on a finding by the Fifth Circuit Court for Davidson County, Tennessee, of ineffective assistance of counsel and the setting aside of a murder conviction. Specifically the Court found that Ramos’s advice to his client not to testify should have been  informed advice and could have only been informed if Ramos knew the client’s own story of events and how he would testify.  At the post conviction hearing Ramos admitted he had no idea of what the petitioner would say if he took the stand.  He contended he thought he really should not press the petitioner to tell him what happened.  He was unaware of the petitioner’s version of events.  It was the judgment of the Court that the advice given by Ramos to his client not to testify also fell below an objective standard of reasonableness. (May 5, 2004)

Speed, Delilah Ann, of Columbia, Tennessee, was transferred to disability inactive status by the Tennessee Supreme Court. Ms. Speed and the Board of Professional Responsibility entered the Agreed Order. Ms. Speed will remain on disability inactive status until such time as the Court adjudges that her disability has been removed. (May 4, 2004)

Green, Gerald S., a Memphis lawyer, was suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court from the practice of law  for a period of six months, with all time suspended and six months to be served on probation.  Green neglected his clients’ legal matters; charged an excessive fee; failed to withdraw when discharged by a client, and failed to deliver to the client all papers and properties to which the client was entitled; failed to represent a client competently; and neglected client matters and failed to adequately communicate with clients, and failed to return client property. (May 3,  2004)

John Carlin Mask, Jr., a Bolivar attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in this State by the Tennessee Supreme Court. (March 31, 2004)

Dennis J. Hughes, a Nashville attorney, was disbarred from the practice of law retroactive to and effective June 24, 1997. (March 30, 2004)

Paul Anthony Robinson, Jr. , of Memphis, was publicly censured by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. (March 25, 2004)

Shawn M. Ashcraft, a Murfreesboro lawyer, was suspended from the practice of law for 20 months after pleading guilty to misappropriation. (March 25, 2004)

Lisa Anne Temple, a Knox County attorney, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility for causing, on two occasions, incorrect disbursements to be made from client funds being held in trust to her former firm, where she was an associate, for unapproved fees. (March 17, 2004)

Benson, Robert D., a former Brentwood attorney suspended last year, was disbarred, based upon Benson’s threat of irreparable harm to the public. (March 15, 2004)

Christopher Robin Fox, Nashville; disbarred.  (Feb. 6, 2004)

Michael A. Belz, Memphis; suspended.  (Jan. 28, 2004)

Thomas L. Whiteside, Nashville; suspended. (Jan. 28, 2004)

Ted A. Burkhalter, Nashville; reinstated. (Jan. 28, 2004)

W. Allen Barrett, Nashville; conditionally censured.  (Jan. 27, 2004)

Charles Gordon, Powell; censured.  (Jan. 26, 2004. )

Lawrence A. Welch Jr., Greenville; censured.  (Jan. 26, 2004)

Thomas Lee Bean, a Crossville attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility for preparing a Durable Power of Attorney on or about May 13, 1998, at the request of the client, someone other than the grantor of the Power of Attorney.  At the request of the client, Mr. Bean included language in the Power of Attorney that it was signed April 2, 1997. (January 22, 2004)

Floyd N. Price, a Nashville lawyer, was ordered suspended from the practice of law by the Tennessee Supreme Court for six months, but the order was stayed. (January 15, 2004)  

D. Michael Van Sant,  a Nashville attorney, was temporarily suspended from the practice of law by the Tennessee Supreme Court. (January 14, 2004)

Newest additions:

2004 -- Alphabetical

Arnold, Rebecca C., of Memphis,  was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility after finding she neglected a client’s Chapter 13 bankruptcy matter, failed to move with reasonable diligence and promptness, failed to properly communicate with her client, and deceived this client by falsely informing the client that she had filed a motion requested by the client.  Moreover, Arnold was very dilatory in responding to Disciplinary Counsel’s inquiries.  The Board noted her demonstrated pattern of dilatoriness, and her history of prior disciplinary sanctions in the areas of neglect and failure to properly communicate with clients. As part of the censure, the Board required Arnold to enter into a TLAP contract for peer assistance to address her chronic depression for a duration to be determined by TLAP, and to ensure that TLAP provides the Board with quarterly progress reports during the period of TLAP monitoring. (Aug. 27, 2004)

Ashcraft, Shawn M., a Murfreesboro lawyer, was suspended from the practice of law for 20 months after pleading guilty to misappropriation. (March 25, 2004)

Bailey, Javier Michael, a Memphis attorney, entered into an Agreed Order and Conditional Guilty Plea which was entered by the Tennessee Supreme Court on May 27, 2004, effective January 2, 2004.    The Agreed Order placed Javier Michael Bailey on probation for a period of four (4) years and eleven (11) months after serving an actual suspension of thirty (30) days, which Bailey served beginning January 2, 2004 through February 2, 2004, during all of which Bailey shall continue to be monitored by the Tennessee Lawyers’ Assistance Program (TLAP) as set forth in the TLAP Monitoring Advocacy Agreement. (May 27, 2004)

Barnwell, Howard Brownlow, a Chattanooga attorney, was temporarily suspended, pursuant to Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, upon a finding that Mr. Barnwell had failed to respond to the Board of Professional Responsibility concerning a complaint of misconduct. (June 11, 2004)

Barrett, W. Allen, Nashville; conditionally censured. (Jan. 27, 2004)

Bean, Thomas Lee, a Crossville attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility for preparing a Durable Power of Attorney on or about May 13, 1998, at the request of the client, someone other than the grantor of the Power of Attorney. At the request of the client, Mr. Bean included language in the Power of Attorney that it was signed April 2, 1997. (January 22, 2004)

Belz, Michael A., Memphis; suspended. (Jan. 28, 2004)

Benson, Robert D., a former Brentwood attorney suspended last year, was disbarred, based upon Benson’s threat of irreparable harm to the public. (March 15, 2004)

Brooks, Troy Lee, a Mt. Juliet lawyer, was suspended Nov. 115, 2004, from the practice of law for misappropriating funds to his own use and posing "a threat of irreparable harm to the public." (Nov. 15, 2004)

Burkhalter, Ted A., Nashville; reinstated. (Jan. 28, 2004)

Cartwright, Richard D.,  a lawyer from Covington, Tennessee, received a Public Censure from the Board of  Professional Responsibility. On April 22, 2004, the Court of Criminal Appeals entered an order finding that Cartwright  “flagrantly disregarded the three previous orders of the Court.”  The Court  further found that although Cartwright’s actions could have resulted in three separate contempts of court, the Court combined the contempts into one and found Cartwright in criminal contempt of court.  The Court further ordered Cartwright sentenced to 10 days in the Madison County Jail and fined $50, provided that nine days of the jail time was suspended provided that attorney Cartwright conform to the rules of appellate practice and further rules of  this court in the conclusion and the handling of the underlying case.  The Court ordered Mr. Cartwright to serve one day in the Madison County Jail from the period of 9:00 A.M. in the morning until 4:00 P.M. in the afternoon. (On July 20, 2004)

Cornell, Helen Loftin, Nashville, was publicly censured by the Tennessee Supreme Court after She acknowledged that she transferred her mother’s home to herself by a power of attorney without the knowledge of her mother, which act required litigation for her mother to regain legal title to her home. (July 12, 2004) More on this lawyer

Fox, Christopher Robin, Nashville; disbarred. (Feb. 6, 2004)

Galbraith, Charles Ford, was placed on disability inactive status as a result of a medical condition. (Dec. 7, 2004)

Gordon, Charles, Powell; censured. (Jan. 26, 2004. )

Green, Gerald S., a Memphis lawyer, was suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court from the practice of law  for a period of six months, with all time suspended and six months to be served on probation.  Green neglected his clients’ legal matters; charged an excessive fee; failed to withdraw when discharged by a client, and failed to deliver to the client all papers and properties to which the client was entitled; failed to represent a client competently; and neglected client matters and failed to adequately communicate with clients, and failed to return client property. (May 3,  2004)

Hughes, Dennis J., a Nashville attorney, was disbarred from the practice of law retroactive to and effective June 24, 1997. (March 30, 2004)

Johnson, Curtis D., a Memphis attorney,  was publicly censured by the Tennessee Supreme Court .  Pursuant to Section 16 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9,  Johnson submitted a guilty plea in exchange for a stated form of discipline.  He acknowledged that he had been negligent in the handling of certain client matters, that he had charged an excessive fee and that he had failed to adequately communicate with his clients. Pursuant to the guilty plea Johnson agreed to and has written an apology to Judge Polster; Johnson shall make and has made restitution to complainant Savannah Robertson; and Johnson shall have a practice monitor for a period of six months from the date of the final order in this cause who shall file written monthly reports to Disciplinary Counsel regarding Johnson’s progress  in establishing adequate communication procedures with his clients. (July 27, 2004)

King, Mary Forrester, of Memphis, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. (June 30, 2004.)

Maddux, H. Owen, a Chattanooga attorney, was suspended from the practice of law for thirty days, placed on probation for one year, and otherwise sanctioned by Opinion and Judgment of the Supreme Court of Tennessee entered August 27, 2004.  A Petition for Rehearing filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility was denied by the Supreme Court on November 9, 2004.  Pursuant to Section 18.5 of Supreme Court Rule 9, the suspension became effective ten days from the date of the denial of the Petition for Rehearing. In December, 1994, Mr. Maddux began taking and converting to his own use partnership fees, income, and/or client payments made by at least seventeen separate partnership clients on approximately fifty different occasions over a three-year period from December, 1994, through November, 1997, in the total sum exceeding $92,000.00.  Mr. Maddux took the partnership fees, income, and/or client payments without the knowledge or consent of the other partners.  On October 16, 1996, the firm filed suit against Mr. Maddux in the Chancery Court for Hamilton County to recover the firm monies.  By Judgment filed in the Chancery Court for Hamilton County, Tennessee, on October 2, 2000, Mr. Maddux was found to have defrauded the partnership and wrongfully converted $92,534.57 in receivables from the partnership.  The Board of Professional Responsibility then filed the Petition for Discipline. Mr. Maddux may resume the practice of law upon the expiration of the period of suspension. (Nov. 24, 2004)

Mask, John Carlin Jr., a Bolivar attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in this State by the Tennessee Supreme Court. (March 31, 2004)

Nacaranto, Tom Anthony, a Lexington attorney, has been suspended for three years by the Tennessee Supreme Court (June 10, 2004)

Perkins, Samuel L., a Memphis lawyer, was censured by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility. In one complaint filed against Perkins, the Board found that he failed to render effective assistance of counsel to a former client in a homicide prosecution, by failing to discover a material witness, by not calling such witness to testify at trial and by losing all record of the witness.  In late 1998, the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals upheld the client’s post-conviction petition and remanded the matter to the Shelby County Criminal Court. The Board placed this disciplinary investigation in abeyance while further proceedings in the client’s matter were before the trial and appellate courts after the 1998 remand. In early 2003, the Board reactivated its investigation after learning that respondent’s former client was convicted of second degree murder at retrial, and that the client received a 15 year sentence. In November 2004, Disciplinary Counsel and respondent entered into a conditional settlement agreement whereby respondent would be publicly censured for his neglect, and whereby respondent would be required to cooperate with his practice assistance monitor and ensure said monitor provides quarterly progress reports to the Board for one year after the filing date of any Public Censure imposed.  Respondent’s practice assistance monitor has agreed to review his caseload periodically, and to review with respondent and provide further instructions on ensuring respondent’s compliance with the Criminal Defense Standards applicable to investigation and preparation. On December 10, 2004, the Board approved the conditional settlement agreement negotiated between Disciplinary Counsel and respondent. (Dec. 10, 2004)

Price, Floyd N., a Nashville lawyer, was ordered suspended from the practice of law by the Tennessee Supreme Court for six months, but the order was stayed. (January 15, 2004)

Renard, Christopher P., a Memphis attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in this state by Order of the Supreme Court. The Court suspended Renard based upon a petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that he failed to respond to Disciplinary Counsel or to the Board concerning two complaints of misconduct. (May 21, 2004)

Ramos, Fernando J.,  a Nashville lawyer, a Nashville lawyer, was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility on May 5, 2004 based on a finding by the Fifth Circuit Court for Davidson County, Tennessee, of ineffective assistance of counsel and the setting aside of a murder conviction. Specifically the Court found that Ramos’s advice to his client not to testify should have been  informed advice and could have only been informed if Ramos knew the client’s own story of events and how he would testify.  At the post conviction hearing Ramos admitted he had no idea of what the petitioner would say if he took the stand.  He contended he thought he really should not press the petitioner to tell him what happened.  He was unaware of the petitioner’s version of events.  It was the judgment of the Court that the advice given by Ramos to his client not to testify also fell below an objective standard of reasonableness. (May 5, 2004)

Speed, Delilah Ann, of Columbia, Tennessee, was transferred to disability inactive status by the Tennessee Supreme Court. Ms. Speed and the Board of Professional Responsibility entered the Agreed Order. Ms. Speed will remain on disability inactive status until such time as the Court adjudges that her disability has been removed. (May 4, 2004)

Robinson, Paul Anthony Jr., of Memphis, was publicly censured by the Supreme Court of Tennessee. (March 25, 2004)

Strohm, Carroll Thomas, of Nashville, was disbarred by the Tennessee Supreme Court (Nov. 30, 2004)

Temple, Lisa Anne, a Knox County attorney, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility for causing, on two occasions, incorrect disbursements to be made from client funds being held in trust to her former firm, where she was an associate, for unapproved fees. (March 17, 2004)

Van Sant, D. Michael, a Nashville attorney, was temporarily suspended from the practice of law by the Tennessee Supreme Court. (January 14, 2004)

Walwyn, Paul J., a Madison lawyer, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. The censure was based on two legal matters.  In one complaint, Walwyn represented a client in a child support and child custody matter.  Walwyn neglected the matter and failed to prepare the matter.  Walwyn failed to prepare a court order as directed by the court for eight months. The other matter was the appeal of a criminal conviction.  Mr. Walwyn filed a notice of appeal five days late and he filed his brief over sixty days late.  After the conviction was affirmed, Walwyn failed to file a timely petition to the Supreme Court resulting in a loss of further review. (July 22, 2004.)

Wasson, Gordon M., and Arizona attorney, was reciprocally suspended from the practice of law in Tennessee. (June 10, 2004)

Welch, Lawrence A. Jr., Greenville; censured. (Jan. 26, 2004)

Whiteside, Thomas L., Nashville; suspended. (Jan. 28, 2004)

 

2003

Charles F. Galbreath, a Nashville attorney, was suspended from the practice of law for thirty days. (December 29, 2003)

Martin H. Aussenberg, a Memphis attorney,  was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility. Aussenberg was admitted to practice in  the 17th Circuit Court District of Mississippi, pro hoc vice by association with local Mississippi counsel in a civil case involving a small corporation.  Aussenberg was held in direct contempt by the Circuit Court of Desota County, Mississippi for failing to follow an order of the court to attend a hearing that was held by the court after the corporation had filed a bankruptcy petition. (December 19, 2003)

Mark Wesley Henderson, a Lebanon lawyer, was suspended from the practice of law for six months. (November 26, 2003)

Michael W. Edwards, Hendersonville; censured. (November 14, 2003)

John Cris Helton, a Chattanooga lawyer, was publicly censured by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility for failing to deposit a retainer fee which was to be billed against an hourly rate unto his trust account until earned. (October 20, 2003)

Joe Mason Brandon, Jr., a Smyrna attorney, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility as a consequence of being found in contempt by the Circuit Court for failing to timely appear in court on three cases.  Mr. Brandon was fined $50.00 and sentenced to ten days in jail, suspended upon attendance to each of his cases on the dates and times assigned. (October 20, 2003)

George H. Thompson, III, a Nashville lawyer, was placed on probation. (October 9, 2003)

Kathleen L. Caldwell, a Memphis lawyer, has been suspended from the practice of law for 90 days by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court, for neglect of client matters for failing to adequately communicate with her clients; for failing to seek court permission to withdraw in a matter before the tribunal when ceasing to represent clients; for charging excessive fees; for representing clients with differing interests, and for losing client property. (October 8, 2003)

Thomas H. Strawn, of Dyersburg, Tennessee, received a conditional public censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility.  Strawn was given notice of the censure and did not request a hearing. The Board of Professional Responsibility engaged a certified public accountant to audit Strawn’s trust account.  The audit revealed inappropriate trust accounting practices. (October 1, 2003)

Warner Hodges, III, a Memphis lawyer, was censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility for ethical violations in four complaints. (September 26, 2003)

Clinton E. Hagaman, an attorney formerly of Knoxville, has been transferred to disability inactive status. (September 24, 2003)

Louis D. Hamric, a Memphis attorney, has been disbarred from the practice of law in this state by order of the Supreme Court. Hamric was disbarred based upon a consent order entered into by Hamric and Disciplinary Counsel. The order stipulated that Hamric consented to disbarment because he could not successfully defend himself on the charges alleged in the complaint filed against him. The disbarment order stipulated that Hamric shall reimburse the Lawyers’ Fund for Client Protection for any monies that it may pay out on his behalf and that Hamric shall make restitution to any clients who have a valid or judgment against him as a result of his misconduct. The disbarment was issued pursuant to Section 15.1 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9. Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9 provides that an attorney disbarred may not apply for reinstatement until the expiration of at least five years from the effective date of the disbarment. The disbarment order shall remain in effect until an order of reinstatement is issued by the Supreme Court of Tennessee, upon a showing by clear and convincing evidence that his reinstatement to the practice of law would in no way be detrimental to the public interest. (September 9, 2003)

Theresa C. Willocks, a Knoxville lawyer, was transferred to disability inactive status.  (September 5, 2003)

Tony Lawrence Maples, a Murfreesboro attorney, was suspended from the practice of law for six months. Mr. Maples may resume the practice of law upon the expiration of the period of suspension. (August 25, 2003)

Debra Fannin Hill, an Oak Ridge attorney, was suspended from the practice of law for 75 days, plus a year of probation, for deceit and misrepresentation. (August 25, 2003)

Moffatt, Charles L. IV, a Bristol attorney, was disciplined for the second time in 28 months by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility, most recently for failing to communicate properly with a client.  (Aug. 13, 2003)

Timothy J. Richter, a lawyer from Springfield, was placed on disability inactive status. (July 31, 2003)

Mark W. Henderson, a Lebanon lawyer, was censured for improper action in representing a client after being fired. (July 31, 2003)

Charles Daniel Collins, a Chattanooga attorney, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility for neglecting his client's divorce action, handling the client's divorce without the preparation adequate in the circumstances, failing to act with reasonable diligence and promptness, failing to keep the client reasonably informed about the status of the matter, and failing to explain the matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation.  (July 28, 2003)

Gerald F. Easter, a Memphis lawyer, has been suspended from the practice of law for sixty (60) days by the Tennessee Supreme court. Disciplinary Counsel filed a petition for discipline pursuant to Rule 9, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, alleging that Easter physically assaulted a fellow lawyer, Thomas Randolph Buckner; was indicted for aggravated assault; pled nolo contendere to simple assault; and was sentenced to be incarcerated for thirty (30) days at 100% beginning July 14, 2003. Pursuant to Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9, Section 16.1, Easter agreed to enter into a conditional guilty plea to the petition in exchange for a sixty (60) day suspension and the completion of a course in anger management prior to September 11, 2003. Easter also agreed to pay the costs of the matter. The Court found sufficient grounds for the suspension and ordered Easter to be suspended for sixty (60) days effective July 14, 2003, and further ordered that Easter complete a course in anger management by September 11, 2003. (July 11, 2003)

Gerald Steve Johnson, a Johnson City lawyer, was suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court for at least six months. His licenses  cannot be reinstated until a law office management expert evaluates his office and certifies that Mr. Johnson has complied with all of her recommendations. The Board of Professional Responsibility received 10 complaints which evidenced a pattern of neglect by Mr. Johnson, as well as insufficient communications with his clients. For instance, he failed to return phone calls or otherwise be available for his clients to speak with him. He represented clients in divorce cases and failed to timely file final orders. He also failed to file required certificates of service in his bankruptcy cases. He failed to timely file other pleadings as well. Mr. Johnson's law license was suspended for a short period of time due to his failure to take sufficient Continuing Legal Education Courses, and he failed to notify his clients of this suspension. (July 10, 2003)

  Emilia Green Ballentine, a Memphis attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in this state by an Order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. The Court suspended Ms. Ballentine based upon a petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that she failed to respond to Disciplinary Counsel or to the Board concerning a complaint of misconduct. (July 2, 2003)

Louis W. Ringger, Jr., a Decaturville attorney, was reinstated to the practice of law, under conditions that:  1) he strictly comply with the obligations of his five-year contract with the Tennessee Lawyer Assistance Program (TLAP) executed November 6, 2002; 2) an attorney approved by the Board of Professional Responsibility (BPR) monitor Mr. Ringger's law practice for a period of two years, and make monthly reports to the BPR; 3) an attorney monitor Mr. Ringger's trust account for a period of two years and make monthly reports to the BPR; 4) Mr. Ringger continue to attend group therapy sessions, once a week, for as long as required by his TLAP contract, but in no event for less than one year; and 5) Mr. Ringger immediately apply for legal professional liability insurance, continue to apply promptly until an application is accepted and purchase and maintain such insurance unless he establishes that amount of the premium for such insurance would work a severe financial hardship.  (July 1, 2003)

Stuart W. Fields, a Nashville attorney, has been temporarily suspended from the practice of law in this state by an Order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. The Court suspended Fields based upon the sworn statement of a client that he forged her signature to a settlement check and misappropriated the client’s funds to his own use. (July 1, 2003)

Jes Beard, a Chattanooga attorney, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility on June 23, 2003, for assisting his client in removing his client's child from the home of the child's grandmother, where the child had been placed pursuant to a safety plan entered into between the child's mother and the Department of Children's Services. (June 23, 2003)

Robert D. Benson, was  summarily and temporarily suspended from the practice law by the Tennessee Supreme Court, upon finding that Mr. Benson presents a substantial threat of irreparable harm to the public.  Disciplinary Counsel filed petitions with the Supreme Court alleging that Mr. Benson had misappropriated client funds and abandoned his practice. (June 3, 2003)

William C. Roberts, Jr., a Nashville attorney, has been suspended from the practice of law in this state for a fixed period of five years by order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee .  The suspension was based on a conditional guilty plea filed by Roberts while the matter was pending before the Chancery Court of Davidson County, Tennessee.  The five year suspension is retroactive to July 10, 2000, the date Roberts was temporarily suspended from the practice of law.  He has been suspended continuously since July 10, 2000, and would be eligible to apply for reinstatement after July 10, 2005. (May 23, 2003)

Patricia Spicer Carden, an attorney who had previously practiced in Williamson County, Tennessee, was disbarred by the Supreme Court of Tennessee.  Ms. Carden had previously received a three-year suspension and had never applied for reinstatement. Her suspension dealt with improprieties and an order forged under the name of Judge Connie Clark of Williamson County.  Ms. Carden continued to practice law or in a law related practice after the suspension of her law license.  As a result, the Supreme Court has now disbarred Ms. Carden.  (On May 20, 2003)

Terrance E. Tatum, of Memphis, has been suspended for 30 days from the practice of law by order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Tatum represented his client without sufficient knowledge of securities law; communicated with investors; drafted documents for his client (who was the subject of investigation by the Dept. of Insurance and Commerce and was ultimately ordered to cease and desist the fraudulent sales of securities), which investors signed to obtain their funds and have not received any funds in return. (May 19, 2003)

Jefre S. Goldtrap, a Nashville attorney, was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility on May 14, 2003.  A public censure is a public rebuke and warning to the attorney but it does not affect the attorney's right to practice law.  The board found that Goldtrap was held in contempt and fined $50.00 by the Court of Criminal Appeals for failure to file a timely brief.  Goldtrap filed a late brief but he acknowledged it was not filed by the deadline the Court had imposed by order.

Joe W. Ellis, III, a Nashville attorney, has been publicly disciplined by Order of the Supreme Court of Tennessee entered on April 29, 2003.  The disciplinary action was based on a conditional guilty plea submitted by Ellis.  The plea was recommended and approved by the Board of Professional Responsibility. The order imposes a suspension of eleven months, twenty-nine days, commencing February 9, 2001, the date upon which Ellis voluntarily ceased the practice of law.  A suspension of less than one year does not require a formal reinstatement hearing and the effect of the Court's order is to reinstate Ellis' license to practice and to begin a two (2) year probation. Ellis was placed on probation for two (2) years commencing April 29, 2003.  During the probationary period Ellis is required to fully comply with a monitoring/advocacy agreement with the Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program (TLAP).  The agreement requires that the lawyer shall remain in treatment with his medical doctor and to take the medication prescribed by the doctor.  The agreement requires random substance and alcohol tests as well as abstinence from the use of alcohol or controlled substances not prescribed by the doctor. (May 13, 2003)

Sam Thomas Burnett, who practiced law in Jamestown, Tennessee at the time of his suspension on March 26, 1991 after a jury verdict in the United States District Court finding Burnett guilty of felony offenses, has been reinstated by the Tennessee Supreme Court because a hearing committee and trial court found Burnett to be morally fit to practice law and determined that his resumption of the practice of law will not be detrimental to the integrity and standing of the bar or the administration of justice or subversive to the public interest. (March 25, 2003)

 Kevin A. Linsley of Dandridge was suspended from the practice of law for three years by the Supreme Court of Tennessee for neglecting several clients, failing to adequately communicate with them, keeping unearned fees and in some matters making misrepresentations regarding his clients' cases. (On March 17, 2003)

Howard Brownlow Barnwell, a Chattanooga attorney, has been reinstated to the practice of law by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  Mr. Barnwell was temporarily suspended from the practice of law by Order of the Supreme Court on January 31, 2003, for failing to respond to a complaint of misconduct. (March 13, 2003)

Robert David Strickland, a Jackson lawyer disbarred by The Tennessee Supreme Court in 1997 for neglect and failure to communicate with his clients, has been reinstated on the following conditions: he "shall comply with all requirements of his contract with Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program for a period of five (5) years;" he "shall have a monitor who is a practicing attorney who shall provide quarterly reports to the Board of Professional Responsibility for period of five years;" and he must successfully complete the essay portion of the Tennessee Bar exam. ( March 12, 2003)

Tara Elena Bazzone: The law license of former Memphis attorney suspended for one year. (Feb. 20, 2003)

Clifford Edward Whitaker, Jr.: Memphis attorney suspended for one year retroactive to May 9, 2002. (Feb. 12, 2003)

Louis Hamric:  Memphis attorney temporarily suspended from the practice of law. (Feb. 4, 2003)(Disbarred Sept. 9, 2003)

Duncan E. Ragsdale, Jr.: Board of Professional Responsibility publicly censures Memphis lawyer . (Feb. 3, 2003.)

Howard Brownlow Barnwell: Law license temporarily suspended.  (January 31, 2003)

Byron R. Simpson: Williamson County lawyer placed on disability list (Jan. 13, 2003)

James Michael Ivey: Parsons lawyer receives Public Censure on January 6, 2003, by the Board of Professional Responsibility (Jan. 6, 2003)

2002

Earnest E. Fiveash Jr.: TBPR slaps Memphis lawyer with four-month suspension (Dec. 31, 2002)

Nancy G. Wallace: Murfreesboro lawyer placed on disability inactive status pursuant to Rule 9, Section 21, Rules of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Ms. Wallace filed a petition with the Supreme Court to be placed on disability inactive status. Ms. Wallace cannot practice law while on disability inactive status. Ms. Wallace can return to the practice of law only after reinstatement by Order of the Supreme Court upon showing by clear and convincing evidence that her disability has been removed and that she is fit to resume the practice of law. (December 20, 2002)

Thomas E. Cowan: Elizabethton lawyer suspended for 30 days (Dec. 19, 2002)

John Thomas March: By order of the Tennessee Supreme Court, former  LaFollette attorney now residing in Illinois, was suspended from the practice of law in Tennessee for a period of two years effective August 31, 2002. (December 17, 2002) 

Charles Mark Pullen: Jackson attorney temporarily suspended from the practice of law upon a petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that he poses a substantial threat of irreparable harm to the public.  (December 16, 2002)

Dwight E. Duncan: On , the Supreme Court of Tennessee entered an Order disbarring Dwight E. Duncan from the practice of law.  The Board of Professional Responsibility filed a Petition for Imposition of Reciprocal Discipline based upon the fact that the Nevada Supreme Court disbarred Duncan for outright abandonment of his clients and his practice. (December 9, 2002)

Michael Lee West: 20 years after disbarring him, the Tennessee Supreme Court reinstated to the practice of law this Chattanooga lawyer,  under conditions that he successfully complete the Tennessee Bar Examination, including the multistate portion, and for the first three years following his re-admission to the Bar, complete three additional Continuing Legal Education hours of ethics each year.  Mr. West had been disbarred by the Supreme Court on November 11, 1982.  (November 26, 2002)

David Randolph Ray:  The law license of David Randolph Ray, formerly of Memphis, has been temporarily suspended by Order of the Tennessee Supreme Court.  The Court suspended Ray based upon a petition filed by the Board of Professional Responsibility alleging that he failed to respond to Disciplinary Counsel or to the Board concerning a complaint of misconduct. (November 26, 2002)

Mark L. PittmanMemphis lawyer publicly censured (Nov. 25, 2002)

Thompson G. Kirkpatrick: State Supreme Court reinstates Memphis lawyer ( Nov. 19, 2002) 

Hubert David Patty: Maryville lawyer suspended for four months (Nov. 1, 2002)

Andrew Craig Troutman: Knoxville lawyer suspended for two months (Oct. 2, 2002)

Louis W. Ringger, Jr.:  Decaturville lawyer suspended (Effective Oct. 2, 2001)

Charles R. Curbo: Memphis lawyer publicly censured (Sept. 25, 2002)

Rodger Bowman: Clarksville lawyer publicly censured (Sept. 23, 2002)

Cynthia N. Asbury: Nashville lawyer suspended (Aug. 30, 2002)

Douglas Paul Jones: Elizabethton lawyer temporarily suspended (Aug. 23, 2002)

Robert C. Rosenbush : Millington Lawyer temporarily suspended (Aug. 19, 2002)

John A. Jennings: Memphis lawyer disbarred (Aug. 20, 2002)

Joseph L. Hornick: Dickson lawyer censured (Aug. 7, 2002)

John H. Norton, III: Shelbyville lawyer placed on probation (July 11, 2002)

Bob McDaniel Green: Johnson City lawyer reprimanded (May 13, 2002)

Martin R. Kriger: Memphis attorney suspended for 30 days (May 29, 2002)

Natalie Victoria Hayes: Lexington lawyer placed on "Disability Inactive' status (May 16, 2002)

Edward L. Swinger: Nashville lawyer suspended, then reinstated to the practice of law. (May 17, 2002)

Shawn M. Ashcraft: Former Murfreesboro lawyer suspended (May 8, 2002)

Mark Edward Chapman: Supreme Court dissolves temporary suspension (May 6, 2002) 

Christopher David Adams: Attorney disbarred by Georgia, Tennessee (May 6, 2002)

Gerald Wayland Pickens: Memphis lawyer receives a public censure (April 15, 2002)

Charles Shoffner Ramsey: Manchester, Coffee County, lawyer transferred to disability inactive (April 23, 2002)

Gary M. Eisenberg: Clarksville receives public censure on two complaints. (April 22, 2002)

John R. Candy: Memphis lawyer suspended. (April 16, 2002)

James P. Wilson III: Nashville attorney temporarily suspended (April 1, 2002) Reinstated May 7, 2002

Frank G. Abernathy: Nashville lawyer suspended for one year (April 10, 2002) 

Helen Loftin Cornell: Nashville lawyer suspended for a period of six months (April 4, 2002) 

Susanna Laws Thomas: Cocke County attorney publicly censured (April 10, 2002)

Thomas Lee Hinson: Memphis lawyer's law license transferred to 'inactive (April 9, 2002)

Stanley R. Barnett: Knoxville lawyer temporarily and summarily suspended (April 1, 2002)

Jeffrey Scott Pulley: Nashville lawyer, publicly censured (March 27, 2002)

Steven M. Moore: Nashville lawyer disbarred for theft from client (Jan. 15, 2002)

Gary M. Eisenberg, Clarksksville, failed to respond to a complaint (Dec. 19, 2001)

Jennifer A. Jenson, of Memphis, misappropriated funds (Dec. 14, 2001); disabled list May 7, 2002

James Lee Phelan: Memphis lawyer's suspension vacated (Nov. 27, 2001)

Jane J. Buffaloe: Nashville lawyer gets three-year suspension (Nov. 20, 2001)

Samuel L. Perkins: Memphis lawyer suspended until Nov. 29, 2001 (Oct. 29, 2001)

Daniel Dwight Erickson: Memphis lawyer temporarily suspended (Sept. 17, 2001)

Howard F. Douglass: Lexington attorney temporarily suspended (Sept. 11, 2001)

Clay Spencer Nails: Lawyer with Miss. and Tenn. practice publicly censured (Sept. 17, 2001)

N. Reese Bagwell Jr: Clarksville lawyer suspended until August 2004.


 

October 2000 thru December 2001

Barnett, Stanley R., of Knoxville: Summarily and temporarily suspended (Dec. 6, 2000)

Beach, Charles L., of Lenoir City: Disbarred (Dec. 8, 2000)

Berlanstein, Martin L., of Memphis: Disbarred (Aug. 21, 2001)

Bolen, Herman Richard, of Knoxville: Publicly censured (Nov. 11, 2000)

Bowman, Rodger N., of Clarksville: Publicly censured (Nov. 11, 2000)

Cawood, F. Chris, of Kingston: Publicly censured (March 26, 2001)

Crawford, Richard H., of Memphis:  Suspended (July 2, 2001)

Dearing, Andrew Jackson III, of Shelbyville: Publicly censured (Aug. 13, 2001)

Garrison, Lewis K., or Memphis: Publicly censured

Head, Benjamin F., of Memphis: Disbarred (Sept. 10, 2001)

Hinson, Thomas L., of Collierville: Temporarily suspended (May 21, 2001)

Hinson, Thomas L., of Collierville: Publicly censured (Sept. 5, 2001)

Nathaniel Barker Hughes III of Memphis:  disbarred. ( Nov. 21, 2001) Suspended (Oct. 18, 2001)

Jordan, John Martin, or Brentwood: Summarily suspended (May 8, 2001) 

Moffatt, Charles L. IV, of Bristol: Publicly censured (February 25, 2001)

Moore, Steven M., of Nashville: Temporarily suspended (March 26, 2001)

Phillips, Rosemary E., of Goodlettsville: Temporarily suspended April 23, 2001

Ringger, Lewis W. Jr., of Decaturville: Summarily and temporarily suspended (May 8, 2001)

Roberts, William Cicero Jr., of Nashville and Shelbyville:Suspended (Nov. 21, 2000)

Sneed, Michael H., of Nashville: Publicly censured (Nov. 21, 2000) and Suspended (Dec. 15, 2000)

Sugg, Edgar Harbert Jr., of Memphis: Publicly censured (April 23, 2001)

Thompson, Almose A. II, of Nashville: Suspended (Nov. 2, 2000)

Welch, Lawrence A., of Greenville: Temporarily suspended (Aug. 13, 2001); Reinstated (Sept. 17, 2001)

Whitenton, Joel D., of Springfield: Temporarily suspended (May 8, 2001); conditionally reinstated (June 19, 2001)

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